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  1. Suzan88's Avatar
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    Thank you very much.....I'm on to it.
  2. mimiknoxtaylor's Avatar
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    There is a site that has tons of Harry Potter paper pieced blocks- i'm on my Ipad right now & don't have it marked- but i'm sure if you do a search you'll find it. If you're interested & can't find it just pm me & I' go to my laptop & see if I bookmarked it.
  3. Suzan88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yevcam
    Let me share what I e-mailed a friend in June: The course description says you will finish a bag, but I will have another UFO. I have not had any time to get back to any of my class projects, but I am determined to finish that project. The beading will be the stumbling block, because if you thought the smocking was time consuming....We shared a table in Junk to Jems; I didn't realize you were also in Rami's class on Friday.
    Hi Yevcam,

    I've only just noticed your response - I've been away.

    If I were being picky I would say there was no chance of a finished product at the class, not even in two days. It took me a week and I found that the course 'pattern' was useless without Rami being there to explain how things were supposed to go together. The picture on her website was too small to be of any use when printed out so I decided to make the bag as I would any other one and I modified the design to suit me. When you get around to completing yours I'd suggest strengthening the smocked area because it's heavier than the rest and tends to sag a bit. I'm pleased with how it's turned out now but you are right about the beading. There no were no suggestions re sizes so I had bought some that were unsuitable and had only four colors in two sizes that might work. I used very small orange ones on the larger pleated part, and at first I thought they wouldn't show up well on the purple I chose but they do. And I've used slightly larger ones on the hexagons - all cheapish craft ones from Jo-Ann's so I've no idea how long they will last. I bought the book but the pattern isn't in it. I don't think Rami has actually written a proper pattern for the whole thing - just a very brief handout - but then she didn't charge extra for one as the other two tutors I had did.
  4. Yevcam's Avatar
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    Let me share what I e-mailed a friend in June: The course description says you will finish a bag, but I will have another UFO. I have not had any time to get back to any of my class projects, but I am determined to finish that project. The beading will be the stumbling block, because if you thought the smocking was time consuming....We shared a table in Junk to Jems; I didn't realize you were also in Rami's class on Friday.
  5. Kathy Osterby's Avatar
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    I use alphalbet beads to mark block rows. Different color for each row.
  6. Suzan88's Avatar
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    That's like paper piecing after the event - what a good idea. I'll dig out a couple of not-quite-right blocks and try it. Thanks, it's good to have several techniques to turn to.
  7. Suzan88's Avatar
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    No, I can't take extreme heat either, especially if it's humid. I live in Maine, in the woods by a 67 acre pond that back home in the UK would be considered a big lake. Right now it's breezy and it's going to be a lovely day so we are going for a drive to the mountains for a change of scenery. If, that is, I can drag my husband away from the golf channel.
  8. w7sue's Avatar
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    Can't remember where I found this - haven't tried it yet - but ...

    An Easy Way to Square-up Quilt Blocks
    If you receive -- or make -- a block that isn't quite large enough, try pressing it first to see if it grows a bit, since blocks are usually too small, not too large.
    If that won't quite do it, or if the patches on the outer edges of the block are a bit skewed or uneven, use this freezer paper method to prep the square up the block for sewing. Gridded freezer paper makes the job easier, but you can work with plain freezer paper if that's what you have on hand.

    1. Cut a piece of freezer paper the exact size your unfinished quilt blocks should be.
    2. Draw two straight lines on the freezer paper's unshiny side--one along the vertical center and one along the horizontal center.
    3. Draw two diagonal lines, each from one corner to the opposite corner.
    4. Draw any other lines you feel will help you position the block on the freezer paper, including the outer 1/4" if you're not using gridded paper.
    5. Place a block on the ironing board, right side down Position the freezer paper on top of the block, shiny (unmarked) side down.
    6. Align the quilt block with the freezer paper image, matching up strategic parts of the block with the drawing. Use short applique pins to stab through areas to keep the two from shifting apart; regular straight pins are fine, but you won't be able to press as easily without removing them.
    7. When the block and the drawn image are aligned as well as possible, press the paper onto the block. Remove the pins.
    8. Inspect the edges of the block. They probably won't all reach the edges of the freezer paper, but they should be well enough into the outer quarter-inch area to catch the seam as it is sewn.
    9. Repeat for all blocks that need to be squared up.
    10. To sew blocks together, align freezer paper edges and check to make sure the patches are matched under the paper. Secure with pins if you like. Sew a seam 1/4" inward from the edge of the paper.
    11. Assemble into rows then join rows. Do not remove papers until all adjoining blocks are sewn together. Leave the papers around the outer perimeter of the quilt until borders are added.

    This method helps prevent skewed quilts by keeping the blocks in-square while you work on them. Your 1/4" seams will be where they should be based on the pattern--and that's sometimes a whole lot different than where they would be sewn if you match-up the edges of inaccurate blocks.
  9. w7sue's Avatar
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    I just received a package of "scraps" recently too. All I did was send postage - they are all pressed and in a pile - I am going to cut them into 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 inch squares (I love Bonnie K. Hunter patterns). If there are any pieces long enough to cut some 2.25 inch strips, I may do some of those too to use for bindings on scrappy quilts. I save all my leftover bindings to sew together for bindings on my scrappy quilts and it will be nice to add to them.
  10. read2me1989's Avatar
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    I don't know where you live but could you send some rain to Illinois? We are so dry here I think it could rain for days and still not be enough and on top of that the temps are hovering around the 100 mark! It is miserable and I usually love hot weather. Not so much right now.
  11. nygal's Avatar
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    Great ..thank you for the links.
  12. Suzan88's Avatar
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    This thread has some great ideas - one or two are genius. It's a good read too.

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