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  1. Rhonda's Avatar
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    It's also called the pillowcase method. You lay the front face down onto the back and batting. then sew around the edge leaving a hole to turn it right side out. turn it then straighten it out. that is birthing.
  2. SoftBlockLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dclutter64
    What kind of mistakes? I have the software to fix it. Send me a pm
    Thank you for taking the time to answer me. The mistakes are numerous. I would like to e-mail the pattern to you so you can fully understand what's wrong. Can I do that from this site. I am very new to this.
  3. Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Wonderful! I was going to recommend taking classes, hopefully you're doing that locally. Hands on classes are great because you can ask questions.

    The Quilting Board is a huge resource for information so it would be helpful for you to check it out as well.

    Best of luck to you Marlee!
  4. Joyti0424's Avatar
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    Thanks again for the advice, that was a great video. I can't wait to finish my first quilt. You are fabulous for helping me out. I bought the "crazy quilt" templates from Missouri Quilt store online and my blocks came out pretty good I think anyway I start a beginners Quilt-A-block a month class next week and am sure I have a heads up now thanks to you. Marlee
  5. Quilter7x's Avatar
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    I personally don't use packaged binding for finishing a quilt. Cut regular fabric strips 2 1/2" wide, sew them all together so that the seam that connects them is on the diagonal (helps reduce bulk), then fold the entire strip in half and press that down so that you end up with one very log strip of fabric about 1 1/4" wide. Any video by the Missouri Star Company will be so helpful to you. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vCWpxBRs20

    As for the basting spray, a regular fabric shop (JoAnn's. Hobby Lobby) will have June Tailor's basting spray, but the 505 can only be found at a quilt shop. It's personal preference, but I don't care for the June Tailor spray. You need lots of ventilation in the room when using it, but I don't find that to be the case with 505. I also think the 505 spray works a whole lot better.

    I'm watching the video as I type, and this video is exactly what you need to watch for how to create binding. Jenny does a great job on all her videos. One thing I do that she didn't do is to press open the seams after sewing the strips together.

    Hmm, I see she isn't using a walking foot, which is surprising. When you don't use one, sometimes your fabrics shift from each other.
    Updated 09-27-2014 at 09:13 AM by Quilter7x
  6. Joyti0424's Avatar
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    thank you for replying Quilter7x, and for your guidance. I haven't come across the videos yet for this part yet but working my way thru so many. I'll go to the store today to buy the basting spray. only thing is, I don't have a walking foot yet, need to buy a better machine than the one I currently own. Thinking of the QE4.2 by pfaff but unsure at this point. can I ask one more question? should I use material strips for the binding or buy packaged binding to finish it off? thanks again for your advice.
  7. Quilter7x's Avatar
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    Typically, you sew all the blocks together, then find a backing that's a little bigger than what your front turns out to be. Put the backing down with the right side against the table (or floor or bed depending on how big it is), then put down the batting and then place your top on the batting with the top facing you. Make sure the backing goes outside the top on all four sides. If you have temporary basting spray (such as 505), you can use that instead of pins. You would roll/pull back half of the top, spray the 505, then put the top back over the batting. Tamp it down with your hands so it will stick, then roll/pull down the other half and spray again. Turn the project upside down and do the same with the backing. If you don't have any kind of temporary basting spray, then you need to use pins to keep the three layers from shifting. Once all that's done, then you can quilt it either by hand or by machine. If you have never quilted before, you might want to watch some videos on YouTube. When using batting in any project, a walking foot for your machine is the best foot to use. Some people don't use them, but they're made for a purpose and this is that purpose. After quilting, trim the three layers, put on your binding (does not have to be on the bias if your project doesn't have curves on the outside edges) and you're done!

    Honestly, YouTube will give you lots of ideas on how to do this. Be prepared to spend a lot of time watching videos! Best of luck to you.
  8. Dclutter64's Avatar
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    What kind of mistakes? I have the software to fix it. Send me a pm
  9. Joyti0424's Avatar
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    beautiful work, enjoy sewing on it
  10. Joyti0424's Avatar
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    what a great idea Tessagin, I recently bought a button from the fabric store and couldn't believe the prices they now sell for. I will be doing some yard sale shopping and looking for buttons. Thanks for sharing this idea
  11. pojo's Avatar
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    Thank you for the chart
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