Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Any Piano Players in the Membership

  1. #1
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    721
    Under general chat I understand we talk about anything. Well, I have a problem. You see we recently attended our DGD(10) piano recital and was delighted with her performance. Then as the eldest students played their song, I whispered I would love to have that piece of sheet music for myself--maybe Mother's Day or the like. Well, son drove into metro just to get the sheet music for GD to give to this grandma for Christmas. (Our gift exchange was early.) And I cannot play it! HELP. It is fully of sharps and I am only fluent at playing flats.

    Does anyone know how to convert sharps into flats when it comes to piano sheet music?

    Thank you - this grandma is struggling, perhaps this is a good time to learn what I did not teach myself as a teenager! I absolutely love the song.

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    10,050
    Blog Entries
    1
    You would need someone to transpose it -- "translate" it into a different key that you can play.

    If you like the piece, you could look for it in other versions. Classical music is usually not transposed into other keys (except for singers), but other types of music (such as Christmas songs) come in many different keys and "arrangements".

  3. #3
    Senior Member B. Louise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Elkhart, IN
    Posts
    386
    If there are not tricky accidentals, 3 sharps go to 4 flats-- A flat; 4 sharps to 3 flats--E flat, 2 sharps to 5 flats--D flat. If you have other questions, you can pm me. Playing in sharps fits the hands differently than flats, but gets more comfortable with practice.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ncsewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    745
    Isn't it funny that it's so much easier to play flats!? How about contacting a highschool or college music department and see if there is a secret to transposing? I didn't look but might even be some online info on how to do that.

  5. #5
    Super Member miss_ticky2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Gold Coast, Australia
    Posts
    2,051
    What key is it in? Some people will play the equivalent flat key. For example, if it's in A, they play A flat..the notes stay in the same place on the music sheet but you just play the corresponding flats for that key.

    Or, it needs to be transposed.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ncsewer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    745
    I'm impressed and I wish I had your knowledge.
    Quote Originally Posted by B. Louise
    If there are not tricky accidentals, 3 sharps go to 4 flats-- A flat; 4 sharps to 3 flats--E flat, 2 sharps to 5 flats--D flat. If you have other questions, you can pm me. Playing in sharps fits the hands differently than flats, but gets more comfortable with practice.

  7. #7
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    721
    Thank you everyone for your hints and encouragements. The name of the piece is Journey West by Renee Schwab. The following link takes you to youtube where you can hear this beautiful music.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2zRp51Jcus

    There are five sharps: F C D A and another upper F (maybe?). I so want to learn this piece because I held my granddaughter on my lap and she road my hands from the ages of 2 thru 4 or 5. Now she is 10 and excited that she can play all by herself and with two hands! Be it far from this grandma not to apply to myself my own words of practice and dedication which I gave to her.

    PS: I am self-taught but have been told I am a fair pianist. Little do many know, I double up on my left-hand notes to make the piece sound more detailed. I love adding a run on the ending notes scale. Certainly any teacher would shake her head but since I play only for my own enjoyment, maybe it does not make any difference at my age.

  8. #8
    Senior Member B. Louise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Elkhart, IN
    Posts
    386
    If there are 5 sharps in the key signature, they are F, C, G, D, and A. You could lower it 1/2 step and play in the key of B flat. But my guess is that if you play just the first 4 measures in the written key, you could get the feel of reaching for those sharps.
    A piano teacher might suggest that you practice Right Hand and Left Hand separately and then put them together. All of the notes are black keys except B and E. Good luck. It's like any skill you practice--FMQ or playing sharps. The more you do it, the better you get.

  9. #9
    Senior Member All Thumbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    721
    Wha hoo - I practiced my FMQ and finally got the hang of it so with your suggestion of the B and E keys, perhaps my mind can wrap around the notes. Thank you so very much!

    May Christmas blessings find you and yours.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.