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Thread: Have you ever made a baby sling?

  1. #1
    Senior Member quiltingmimipj's Avatar
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    Have you ever made a baby sling?

    I am interested in locating a simple pattern to make a baby sling. These would be sent to Honduras through a mission group.
    Material MiMi

  2. #2
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    I used a "baby sling" when my kids were infants. Simply took a piece of fabric long enough to make a big soft knot and to hold the infant, left on the selvages for sturdiness. It left me with free hands and also a modesty covering for nursing.
    You could make a pattern by trying it on yourself. It seems like I put a zipper in the last one I used (maybe since I had to chase (watch) the bigger ones I felt I needed it!).

    Have you googled "baby slings"?

  3. #3
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Try this:
    “One of the most familiar traditional baby carriers is the Mexican baby sling, or rebozo (reh-boh'-soh). The word rebozo means shawl in Spanish, which indicates the everyday function of this traditional cloth. Like so many traditional baby slings around the world, the rebozo is "whatever you need it to be at the time": cool-weather wrap, knapsack, sash, elegant shawl, or, yes, baby carrier. Also like so many other traditional cloths, rebozos are an expression of Mexican art, history, and culture. There was a time when a woman's status in society could be guessed by the quality of her rebozo.
    Rebozos are generally about 30 inches (75 cm) wide, varying in length from about 80 to 110 inches (200 to 275 cm). They are traditionally hand-woven of cotton or silk, and finished on the ends with fringe, which can be knotted simply or braided elaborately. Modern technology and materials have affected rebozo-making, like everything else. Today the most commonly available rebozos are machine-woven, often of acrylic or rayon, sometimes with hand-tied fringe.
    Quality rebozos are lightweight, compact, and versatile. The fabric "gives" just enough to be comfortable for wearer and baby, and they are often gorgeous, to boot. How much of your baby gear can you use pre- and post-baby? Money spent on high-quality rebozos is an investment in Mexican folk art.”

    Google Rebozo Baby Wearing for many sites an much information.

    Jan in VA
    Jan in VA
    Living in the foothills
    peacefully colors my world.

  4. #4
    Senior Member quiltingmimipj's Avatar
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    Baby Sling

    Quote Originally Posted by Jan in VA View Post
    Try this:
    “One of the most familiar traditional baby carriers is the Mexican baby sling, or rebozo (reh-boh'-soh). The word rebozo means shawl in Spanish, which indicates the everyday function of this traditional cloth. Like so many traditional baby slings around the world, the rebozo is "whatever you need it to be at the time": cool-weather wrap, knapsack, sash, elegant shawl, or, yes, baby carrier. Also like so many other traditional cloths, rebozos are an expression of Mexican art, history, and culture. There was a time when a woman's status in society could be guessed by the quality of her rebozo.
    Rebozos are generally about 30 inches (75 cm) wide, varying in length from about 80 to 110 inches (200 to 275 cm). They are traditionally hand-woven of cotton or silk, and finished on the ends with fringe, which can be knotted simply or braided elaborately. Modern technology and materials have affected rebozo-making, like everything else. Today the most commonly available rebozos are machine-woven, often of acrylic or rayon, sometimes with hand-tied fringe.
    Quality rebozos are lightweight, compact, and versatile. The fabric "gives" just enough to be comfortable for wearer and baby, and they are often gorgeous, to boot. How much of your baby gear can you use pre- and post-baby? Money spent on high-quality rebozos is an investment in Mexican folk art.”

    Google Rebozo Baby Wearing for many sites an much information.

    Jan in VA
    Since these would be used for a mission project, this is not something we could do. I did enjoy reading about the rebozo.

    Thank you.
    Material MiMi

  5. #5
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
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    here are a couple free patterns. http://www.sewingsupport.com/sewing-...by/slings.html
    I had a non-sewing friend that kept asking me to make her variations since she led a young mommy group and often demonstrated new patterns at her meetings. It's been a long time but I do remember the type of fabric used changed requirements for the rings (fabrics with some give, stretchy, or slick and non-giving fabrics like silks) and I imagine the size of the baby is a factor as well. I only made them for tiny munchkins but I'm sure there's some great info online.
    OVER THE RAINBOW JANE is the name of my Dear Baby Jane----though it should be poor, neglected & may never ever be finished baby jane!
    http://retrofabulous-retro.blogspot.com

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