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Thread: Hemming pants tip form I don't remember Thank YOU

  1. #1
    Super Member Bill'sBonBon's Avatar
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    I don't remember who gave this tip the one about useing the same hem on pants that are to long. My DH has short legs,never can find anything that I don't have to cut and hem. I couldn't remember the exact instructions but I must have done it right because I hemmed DH PJs in less than 10 min. Using the same Hem that was on the PJs. No more cutting turning under ironing turning under again and pinning. It worked Perfect. Thank You who ever you are. Don't have time today to do search.
    BillsBonBon



  2. #2
    Junior Member Quilting G's Avatar
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    How about sharing...
    I always have to hem my slacks and would love a quicker way to do it.

  3. #3
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    For those that still do hemming the "hard" way - if your pants are tapered, be sure to let out the lower part (the amount of the hem) of the leg seams so there is enough fabric to "go around"

    This way the puckers are eliminated.

    If your pants have tapered legs, the bottom circumerence is less than the upper circumference.

  4. #4
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    Here ya go!

    How To Hem Jeans PROPERLY:

    This method keeps the original hem intact. This method takes less than 30 minutes. Read ALL THE WAY through instructions FIRST.

    Information you should know BEFORE hemming.
    This procedure is best done one leg at a time, so as not to have too much undoing in case something goes awry. It’s also good to know ahead of time the length you want each leg to be. At times, one leg will be a bit shorter or longer.
    Hems should fall just below the bottom of your ankle. If you generally wear higher heels, or a certain height of heel, you might want your hem a bit longer - it should fall an inch to a half inch above the floor AT your heel.
    Steps for PROPER hemming.
    Step 1: Decide how much length you would like to take off. Divide that number in half.
    Step 2: Cuff the jeans. I wanted to take two inches off my hem, so I measured one inch out from the original hem line and pinned. (Do not include the distance from the hem to the end of the jean in your calculations.)

    Step 3: Pin around the rest of the cuff, taking care to measure each time you pin.

    Mind the seams while you’re pinning. Make sure that the stitching lines up at each seam.
    Step 4: It’s time to stitch. You want to place your needle and continue sewing right next to the original hem. Stitch on the right side of the hem, or the side farthest from the bottom of the jean. Sew all the way around the cuff. Be sure you don’t sew through both front and back sides of the jeans (making it so that the foot hole is sewn shut)!


    You can either cut the excess off, leaving about a half inch for fraying, or iron the extra material in.

    Turn the leg right side out and press the new seam flat, revealing the old hem.

    This method ensures that your hem will look original.


    1) This trick works just as well with jean skirts and other denim items.
    2) If you have already cut your hem off and still have it, you can still follow these directions. After you have decided on a length, do NOT divide in half as Step 1 suggests. Move on to Step 2. You will essentially be reattaching the original hem in this step. Pin the stitched line at your desired length (for instance, if you want your jeans to be 30 inches long, measure 30 inches from the inseam and pin the disconnected hem to that length on the jean leg, right sides together) and follow the steps from here.
    3) If the jean legs are flared, cut off the hem about an inch above the stitched hemline. Measure the circumference of the hem. Then, measure the circumference of the jean and the desired length you’re hemming it. Open the side seam of the jean several inches above where you want the jean to be hemmed. Take in the jean to the same circumference as the hem. You’ll want to make this look gradual. Reattach the hem portion following the directions in No. 2 above. This method NOT RECOMMENDED if the jean leg is more than an 1 1/2″ larger than the circumference of the hem.
    4) This method can easily be done hand as well.
    5) If you are having trouble sewing over the seam with your machine, try a DENIM NEEDLE. If this fails, you can always sew up to each side the seam (be sure to backstitch) and sew over the seam by hand. It works just as well.

  5. #5
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    could/would you post pictures?

  6. #6
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    I would if I could. Never took pictures of myself doing that. Hadn't really even thought of it.

    Anyone who wants to do so could just follow the instructions to hem their pants, just taking pics as they go. Voila, pictorial tut! Volunteers anyone?

    I have printed that out and given to more than a few people who have trouble hemming pants, ESPECIALLY JEANS, and they have ALL been thrilled with doing them that way.

  7. #7
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill'sBonBon
    I don't remember who gave this tip the one about useing the same hem on pants that are to long. My DH has short legs,never can find anything that I don't have to cut and hem. I couldn't remember the exact instructions but I must have done it right because I hemmed DH PJs in less than 10 min. Using the same Hem that was on the PJs. No more cutting turning under ironing turning under again and pinning. It worked Perfect. Thank You who ever you are. Don't have time today to do search.
    BillsBonBon

    That would have been me. I have looked and looked for the thread, but I cannot find it. Must have been deleted for some reason or another. I didn't know there was a name for it, but found out later, it's called a french hem.

    Here is a picture for clarification.

    [IMG]http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a1...s/IMG_1022.jpg[/IMG]

  8. #8
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
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    It is simply a "bound" hem.

  9. #9
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    I deeply apologize. I misread. Thought it was a request for how to hem. Shouldn't have stepped in here.

    Will definitely try to be more careful next time.

  10. #10
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
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    Absolutely no need for an apology. I read the first post, and had indeed started a thread about hemming jeans because I was so excited about it, just thought I would share. I didn't know there was a name for it, but Shadow Dancer stepped in and said it was called a "French hem." Whatever. Anyway, please don't feel as if you stepped on any toes. At least not mine! 8)

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