Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Hijacking/hacking into your computer

  1. #1
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    Let's keep this topic's tone as upbeat as possible please... I just wanted to pass this on, as many of us have and do use WiFi in various public places.

    I was just watching a news show, and they were telling the public about a new program that intercepts information from your computer when using any unsecured internet provider.

    This mainly refers to using public WiFi access in places like bookstores, cafes, anywhere that lets you use it for free.
    It doesn't matter if they give you a password. Chances are there are many, many others who have been given this password too...
    The person sitting next to you could be sharing your computer and you wouldn't know it, until something bad happens... You may not know it until later that day, or a few days later.

    If you have wireless in your home, and haven't password protected it, you are at risk too.

    This program is free... and available to anyone...

    This program literally lets anyone gain access to your computer while you are surfing the net on a unsecured network. The only sites they can't intercept are ones where the url starts with https: These sites use an encryption program that blocks this hacker program.
    For those of you who do not know what a url is, look at the top of your screen, in the address bar is the url. here it is http:// quiltingboard.com

    I am NOT saying our board is not safe, I am just using this sites url as an example :D:D:D

    I would think that this may be how so many email accounts have been hacked into, as well as the problems many have had with their facebook and other accounts as well.

    Here is the news story in written form as well as a video clip of a reporter using the program at a coffee shop, hacking into customers facebook accounts... it also further explains how this hacker program works.

    http://www.komonews.com/news/tech/107360348.html

  2. #2
    Super Member Quiltforme's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Beautiful Washington state!
    Posts
    3,344
    Very good information it is very easy to set the security on your wireless router in home I see all the time my neighbors who are online with no security for their system. Thank you Amma for posting this!

  3. #3
    Power Poster cjomomma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Murray, Ky. Looking for a nice cushy pillow to rest my head on!
    Posts
    16,526
    Blog Entries
    2
    My WiFi is set private with a password but about 6 of my neighbors don't have a password for theirs and I can connect to them, which my comp does from time to time.

  4. #4
    Member Windwalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    94
    There are people who drive neighborhoods with laptops looking for unsecured wifi.Sometimes a simple precaution is all it takes.

  5. #5
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,258
    Can't understand why you would have an unsecured wireless network in your home, it is so easy to have it encrypted.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    High Entropy Zone
    Posts
    1,250
    I'm guilty of an unsecured WIFI on one network server in my home and a secure WIFI for the other. We had so many computers in and out of the house during that period of time (kids and their friends, students, etc.). If you give out your password to the secure one, you might as well give it out to them all. Now I am down to the secure WIFI with firewalls for my firewalls.

  7. #7
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,108
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by lab fairy
    I'm guilty of an unsecured WIFI on one network server in my home and a secure WIFI for the other. We had so many computers in and out of the house during that period of time (kids and their friends, students, etc.). If you give out your password to the secure one, you might as well give it out to them all. Now I am down to the secure WIFI with firewalls for my firewalls.
    I understand completely... I know if I had teens at home, the WiFi would be shared too...

    Maybe do a quick change of password while they are around, and be cautious of where you go online while they are using it? Then change the password back when they are gone?

  8. #8
    pookie ookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Trifid Nebula
    Posts
    1,305
    Safety is illusion. Nothing is ever safe.

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    High Entropy Zone
    Posts
    1,250
    Trust me, running two separate networks was easier than trying to change passwords every hour. My house was grand central for a long time. I had one network with virtually nothing except the access to the WIFI. The other was secure.

    Now, I've shipped off my children to Universities and reclaimed my cyberspace. I'm down to one very secure server. It is amazing how much cooler the house stays when there isn't 5-10 computers running at the same time. :roll: I tell my son that my electric bill cut in half when he moved to Lubbock. Kids and their electronics.

  10. #10
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    High Entropy Zone
    Posts
    1,250
    Quote Originally Posted by pookie ookie
    Safety is illusion. Nothing is ever safe.
    I agree with you.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.