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Thread: Old socks

  1. #1
    Senior Member jetayre's Avatar
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    Old socks

    Does any one hate to throw away old socks (clean). They seem to grow around here I hate wasting things so I was wondering if anyone has used some for stuffing for animal beds? Are they too lumpy for comfort?

  2. #2
    Senior Member sewred's Avatar
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    I've never stuffed dog beds with them. Although I like to make things with them like Sock bunnies for Easter and Sock monkey's for Christmas!
    Sew, sew, it's the threads that keep love together :>} I love sunbonnet sue,old-fashioned things like 1950's or older housewife things, and like hankies,tea towels and aprons . Thanks to some lovely members on here I now have lots of aprons in my collection !!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Diannia's Avatar
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    No I haven't but they work great for dusting!
    I am too blessed to be stressed and too anointed to be disappointed!

  4. #4
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    They do work great for dusting. They are also great for polishing shoes and for putting shoes inside for travel.

  5. #5
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    I use them for dog toys. I layer 2-3 socks (selecting ones without holes) and stuff half of it firmly with batting scraps and a sprinkle of catnip then stitch it shut so the cuffs are left open & loose. They like to gnaw on the stuffed part and nose around in the sort of "flower" made by the cuffs. The cuff part also usually stays slobber free so there's a "safe" place to grab it to give it a toss. Great for indoor fetch games.

    The catnip part probably seems weird but my dogs LOVE catnip. They don't get all wild like the cats do but they are always interested in the smell and will pay much more attention to a sock toy with catnip than one without.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetayre View Post
    Does any one hate to throw away old socks (clean). They seem to grow around here I hate wasting things so I was wondering if anyone has used some for stuffing for animal beds? Are they too lumpy for comfort?
    If they are the white athletic socks, I cut the tops off and use the foot part for rags, then stitch the raw edge of the cuff closed and use it to store everything from safety glasses to cords. If it's a good stretchy synthetic or wool, the top parts I use for cuffs on jackets and long sleeved shirts & sweaters, doesn't matter if the shirts are knit or woven. Sometimes I stitch just the raw edge to the garment, other times I stitch both edges to the sleeve to get a thick cuff. My down coat sleeves let cold air enter at the wrist. A heavy sock top in a dark color takes care of that. I began using the sock tops when "Stretch & Sew" patterns were so popular and it seemed that my children grew only in length. Eventually, I stopped buying the ribbing for cuffs, and used just socks.

  7. #7
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    We usually just tie a knot in them and toss them to the dogs for toys. Even as puppies they learn fairly quickly that the ones with knots are theirs and the ones without knots - not theirs!

  8. #8
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    I bag up old socks along with worn out t-shirts and the like (anything that is all or mostly cotton), label it "rags", and give it to Goodwill. I think they sell bulk cotton to paper factories.

  9. #9
    Super Member AngeliaNR's Avatar
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    If they seem lumpy, you could cut them up a bit.
    Courtesy is not optional.

  10. #10
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    I don't see why you can't use them for stuffing in animal bedding. I'd just whack at them with a rotary cutter to make them into smaller pieces. I know someone who uses all her trimmings when squareing up material and blocks as stuffing. I believe she also mixes it with left over pcs of batting and regular stuffing.

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