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Thread: Plant A Row for the Hungry

  1. #1
    OnTheGo's Avatar
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    For those wanting to know how/where to donate extra vegetables to the hungry....I found sights on AOL for most states by typing in PLANT A ROW FOR THE HUNGRY. To get specifics for your area, just add in (your state's name) at the end of query above using Google or whatever search engine you want. Most states seem to have some involvement in this nation wide program.

    In my opinion, it's a good idea to give to someone you already know that needs it first. I think we all probably know someone who could use some extra food, then branch out.

    Flying V mentioned the battered women's shelter.....I think they probably run on donations and I think that would be an excellent place to give.

  2. #2
    Super Member Favorite Fabrics's Avatar
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    Can you imagine how much could be accomplished, if gardeners even planted a half-row extra, or even a single potted tomato plant?

  3. #3
    Super Member oldswimmer's Avatar
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    I've been doing this for more than 15 years, and take my veggies to a food pantry. It was originally started by the Garden Writers association, I beleive. They are always so appreciative. As an employee of the extension service, I wrote articles on gardening every week. I also had to take care of the 4-H horticulture part of our fair. They used to just let the vegetables sit out on display and rot. I changed that, and then would take about 1/2 of the veggies off of the plates and deliver them to the food pantry. It is a great program, and really is an easy thing to do! I encourage everyone to give it a try. I always have enough for neighbors and plant a row!

  4. #4
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    What a great idea :D:D:D

  5. #5
    Super Member DebraK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite Fabrics
    Can you imagine how much could be accomplished, if gardeners even planted a half-row extra, or even a single potted tomato plant?

    We plant our front yard with vegetables, and give well over half away just to neighbors. I'm always sad that some folks think they have to steal. but we plant anyway. I'm even more disappointed that people turn us into the city as a nuisance. How can growing food be a bad thing?

  6. #6
    Super Member MissTreated's Avatar
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    Wish we knew about this when my father was still alive. He planted a huge garden and got way more produce than he, my mother, my brother and I, and all the neighbors within a 5 mile radius could eat. He tried to give it to the food bank and they told him they couldn't take it because it was home grown. They rattled off a bunch of reasons, but it was rediculous. He always mentioned he wished he could donate his vegetables somehow. Too bad the internet wasn't a part of his life!

  7. #7
    Super Member oldswimmer's Avatar
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    If anyone has trouble finding a "food bank" that can accept donations of home grown produce, I would encourage you to check with the churches. The center where I take my PAR (plant a row) produce is run by the churches in our town. They came together and support this endeavor. They prepare meals and they have used clothing and household things that they "give" to those in need. It is all run by donations, and the churches take turns preparing the meals. It is truly a blessing for our community. Also, the senior centers may be a place to donate extra produce.

  8. #8
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Check with the shelter before taking fresh foods. I took a bushel of butter beans to our local women's shelter and was told they doubted any one there would want to shell all those beans. I noticed a group of teens sitting there in the rec room watching TV. I took my beans and came home. It's amazing how many donations are tossed or wasted and the giver has no idea.

  9. #9
    Super Member PurplePassion's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BellaBoo
    Check with the shelter before taking fresh foods. I took a bushel of butter beans to our local women's shelter and was told they doubted any one there would want to shell all those beans. I noticed a group of teens sitting there in the rec room watching TV. I took my beans and came home. It's amazing how many donations are tossed or wasted and the giver has no idea.
    Yes, some people would rather just open a can or bag and warm their food up in the microwave. I feel so bad for the kids that never know what fresh veggies taste like.

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