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Thread: Quilting Skills Really Help When Sewing Clothes

  1. #1
    Super Member CAS49OR's Avatar
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    Quilting Skills Really Help When Sewing Clothes

    I'm new to sewing and quilting. I stumbled into quilting when I was just starting to sew a couple of years ago. I took the class to make friends and use my machine more.

    I've sewn about six quilts, and I'm learning to make clothes. I originally wanted to learn to sew so I could make clothes that fit, but got the quilting bug!

    I'm sewing a nightgown of gingham seersucker fabric now and find myself using quilting skills.

    I set the seams before I press them open, for example.

    I just thought of using Elmer's school glue to tack the yoke seam allowance in place until I've sewn over it, instead of pins. (I see the tip often mentioned in piecing discussions here.)

    btw, The seam ripper works equally well for both hobbies ... I forgot to iron the seam allowances up so they would be sewn down by the stitching around the yoke. Sometimes I think I spend more time ripping than sewing! Of course I used a pretty decorative stitch, so almost 2 hrs. to remove it.

    I used my rotary cutter to cut most of the pattern out! I use quilting rulers and the cutter to trim seams.

    I think more quilting skills translate to sewing than vice-versa. What do you think?

    I think reading patterns for both can be equally challenging, especially if you don't know the lingo!

    Any tips you can think of that will be helpful? I can find many quilting classes in my area, but few sewing classes. I took a beginning class, which prompted me to get my new machine out of the box after three years,
    It was a great deal on a Janome, new in the box for $169.00 which has turned out to be a great machine, similar to the Memory Craft 5700.

    Oh ......... one thing that was freaky-deaky, the 5/8" seam allowance this pattern calls for, it seems huge compared to the 1/4" used for piecing!

    :-)
    CAS

  2. #2
    Senior Member vanginney's Avatar
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    I have been a quilter for 20 years and just recently took up sewing clothes. Sewing classes in my town are non-existent. I take one starting monday on pants.

    That said, I took the sassy librarian blouse on craftsy.com i was impressed with the step by step video tutorials (at 25 which were 20 minutes long). So worth the 9.99 I paid for it with the pattern included.

    Good luck! I am very excited to be branching out.

  3. #3
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    I know how to sew clothes. But I somehow never get the sizing correct!

  4. #4
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CAS49OR View Post
    Oh ......... one thing that was freaky-deaky, the 5/8" seam allowance this pattern calls for, it seems huge compared to the 1/4" used for piecing!
    isn't that the truth!!!
    Nancy in western NY
    before you speak THINK
    T is it True? H is it Helpful? I is it Inspiring? N is it Necessary? K is it Kind?



  5. #5
    Junior Member BDawn's Avatar
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    I have just started quilting and I find I use my quilting rulers when sewing.
    IMO both is an art in it self with challenges. Sewing pattern Co. can vary in size so it takes practice to learn how to cut to fit and pin, pin and try on again and pin. This is what works for me.

  6. #6
    Power Poster nativetexan's Avatar
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    Yep, that 5/8th seam will get you every time. i don't think of them now, it's been so long since i did any sewing of clothing of any kind.

  7. #7
    Super Member Abby'smom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EllieGirl View Post
    I know how to sew clothes. But I somehow never get the sizing correct!
    I used to sew my clothes until I discovered Macy's and Dillard's sales -- LOL -- maybe polyester knit was the secret to success in those long ago days!! -- for some years my sewing has been limited to quilts, a few related craft items, and Abby the Labby's Vogue pattern fleece shirts -- but yes, some of my sewing skills have improved!!
    diane

  8. #8
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    I have sewn clothing a lot over the years and one thing to be aware of is that the patterns are a size smaller than the things you buy in the store so check out the sizing on the back to be sure it will fit. The things in the store were resized to make us all think we are smaller than we are and the pattern companies did not follow suit. i would be happy to help you in any way you would like. Just send me a note - not sure if emails are allowed on here - I'll check later to see if you have responded. Good luck!!

  9. #9
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    I have sewed clothing almost all my life it's only been in resent years I started quilting. Yes they are different animals all together but at the same time very much alike.
    The first thing that I had to get use to was the difference in seam allowances But let me just say this, YOU CANNOT USE QUILTING SEAMS to make clothing and without surging or some other way of reenforcing the seams they will not hold up. The reason is (in my opinion) is that clothing is subjected to a whole lot more stress on the seams. If you use the 1/4" seam allowances on clothing, your clothes will ware out faster and you will not have enough seam left to fix them.
    Personally, I like the extra seam allowance on clothes patterns because I could turn them under and stitch them a second time which added strength to all my seams. There is a name for it but I never did know what it was called. It hides all the raw edges in the process as well . Some of the shirts I made my son when he was in the 4H club are still being used by the children today and he is 27 yrs old now. The colors might be a little faded but the shirts themselves have held up nicely.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by seasaw2mch View Post
    I have sewed clothing almost all my life it's only been in resent years I started quilting. Yes they are different animals all together but at the same time very much alike.
    The first thing that I had to get use to was the difference in seam allowances But let me just say this, YOU CANNOT USE QUILTING SEAMS to make clothing and without surging or some other way of reenforcing the seams they will not hold up. The reason is (in my opinion) is that clothing is subjected to a whole lot more stress on the seams. If you use the 1/4" seam allowances on clothing, your clothes will ware out faster and you will not have enough seam left to fix them.
    Personally, I like the extra seam allowance on clothes patterns because I could turn them under and stitch them a second time which added strength to all my seams. There is a name for it but I never did know what it was called. It hides all the raw edges in the process as well . Some of the shirts I made my son when he was in the 4H club are still being used by the children today and he is 27 yrs old now. The colors might be a little faded but the shirts themselves have held up nicely.
    I believe you are referring to French seams. They do work well. 1/4 inch on the first seam wrong sides together and then 3/8 inch seam on the second seam right sides together.

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