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Thread: Wisdom of the Aprons

  1. #1
    Super Member Quilt4u's Avatar
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    On this Earth Day I'd like to honor a few down-to-earth women who were ahead of their time - my grandmothers. They were part of that generation molded by the Great Depression. Their ideas saved money, and to them, were just common sense. Ideas coincidently, that often show up on 'How To Save The Earth' lists.

    So instead of the usual soap-box preaching that seems to accompany Earth Day, reminding us to do what we know we should be doing, allow me to pick up my soap box and turn it over. Inside this old box is years of wisdom learned from standing apron-side to my Grandmothers:

    Never use a tea bag less than 5 times.

    Tissues were intended for guests. Use a hankie. If you must use a kleenex, tuck it in your sleeve for easy access. Use it until there is no corner unsoiled.

    Old clothes are an opportunity for sewing creativity, not a donation. Use them to sew quilts, curtains, other clothes, etc.

    Save your butter papers for greasing pans, your old milk for cooking, and ALL plastic bags get washed and reused.

    Coffee grounds perk up your flower beds.

    Save all bread heals for casseroles, mopping grease, croutons, and crumbs.

    Sneak old rusty nails from the barn walls and stick in the ground under hydrangeas for beautiful flower colors. (Careful which nails you remove.)

    Use plates to cover food in the refrigerator.

    Put on a sweater if you are cold, 'That's why I knit it for you child!'
    ~~~

    What is in your soapbox? Did your mother, grandmother, or great grandmother teach you common sense ideas to save money and the Earth?

  2. #2
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Three cheers for yesterday's grams :D

  3. #3
    Moderator littlehud's Avatar
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    Oh my goodness, I can see and hear my Grandma in every one of those.

  4. #4
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    I agree with all you say except one. Never use Hankies!!!! They carry germs. use a tissue an throw it out. To this day when I see a man or woman pull out a hankerchief and blow there nose and then put it back in there pocket it rubs me the wrong way. Just my opinion. Marge

  5. #5
    Power Poster Ninnie's Avatar
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    Thank you for this post. It brings back so many memories of my Grandma, and all the things she did. Always had a hanky tucked in her watch band and always ironed all grandpa's hankies. She made sure he had a fresh one every morning. So true about the rusty nails . They raised me. so they were all the parents I had and they taught me to be frugal. Never threw anything away. Used sheet blankets for batting in quilts. She would can in a big wash tub over an open fire outside. Cellar was always full of good things to eat. After she passed away at the age of 93, I found some Bow Tie squares in her linen closet and brought them home and a quilter was born, so I have her to thank for that also. Now I am the grandmother and it is my goal to pass some of this on.




    Ninnie

  6. #6
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    My paternal grandmother did not throw away ANYTHING :lol: :lol: :lol: Newspapers, jars, (rusty lids and rings were buried in flower beds), clothing, magazines, I could go on forever! "You never knew when it could come in handy!" She canned, cooked strictly from scratch, leftovers were used, recycled, and used again! She had compost piles everywhere, wonderful vegetable gardens every year. They raised cows, chickens and pigs, for them and for sale to cover raising expenses. Kleenex were ok, sometimes....hankies always tucked somewhere. Electricity was never wasted,kitchen sink water was piped out to her flower beds using a home made soaker hose out of a worn out garden hose. She could pinch a penny until it squealed!! Clothes hung on lines indoors/outdoors...no fancy firestarting electricity sucking newfangled machine for her!!! The only splurge for her was flowers, if she found one that called to her she would buy it, BUT, only after calling everyone she knew to see if a cutting, bulb, or whatever was available for free!!! I loved her and was grateful for all she taught me, when times were tough, especially when I was raising my kids, it made me look around and go hmmm?????

  7. #7
    pal
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    I was taught that the last drop of ketchup (or anything) costs exactly
    as much as the first drop cost.

    When I want to make a purchase, I always figure out how many hours I
    had to work to earn the money to buy something - and is it worth working so hard for. That sure stops impulse buying.

    I was taught, and taught my children, that they could borrow money from
    me anytime but that I wanted them to repay it every week - even if they gave me a quarter a week - . And now I see that my little Grandkids have the same options.

  8. #8
    Super Member SulaBug's Avatar
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    Thank you for such great wisdom.
    :D :D :D

  9. #9
    Super Member Barb M's Avatar
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    Oh i remember the days of my mom making us 4 girls dresses, and you all know about the huge 3" hems back then, that would get lowered as you grew, and then taken back up again as it was passed down to next sister lol lol.

  10. #10
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pal
    When I want to make a purchase, I always figure out how many hours I
    had to work to earn the money to buy something - and is it worth working so hard for. That sure stops impulse buying.
    I was taught this by my parents, and taught it to my children too...you are sooo right about it taming the urge to impulse buy!!!! :wink: :wink:

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