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Thread: Greetings and questions!

  1. #1
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    Question Greetings and questions!

    Hello everyone,

    Greetings from Newfoundland, Canada! I am very new to quilting, and am anxious to learn from you all. There are so many products available, not to mention fabrics and patterns! I have a question---have any of you used fusible batting? It says there is a 3-5% shrinkage with the product. Could you wash it before using it, thus eliminating the potential shrinkage issue, or would that nullify the fusing ? I would appreciate any advice you could give. I am hoping to make a quilt for a double bed. (I think I have more nerve than brains Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    I have used a fusible batting for smaller quilts. Never pre-washed and have not had a problem with shrinkage. This is a good question and I will be following this post to see what the more experienced quilters have to say.

  3. #3
    Super Member crafty pat's Avatar
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    Welcome from SC Texas. I have never used fusible batting so I can't help you, I am sure there are some here who can.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the reply, Jeanette. I am thinking this batting would cut out a lot of work. Really appreciate your input.

  5. #5
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    Thanks,Pat.

  6. #6
    Power Poster
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    Welcome from Ontario, Canada. I love Hobbs 80/20 fusible quilt batt. The fusible is water solvable so don't wash it before using or use steam. If you get your quilt out of the dryer before it is completely dry and block it flat on a sheet, it keeps it's just made look.

  7. #7
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Welcome from Minnesota and happy quilting
    Nancy in western NY

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunbonnetSmart.com View Post
    Hi there, Annie17 and Jeannette51! Good to e-meet you. Fusible battings have a special type of water soluble fusing, unlike fusible interfacing fabric used to interline clothing collars and cuffs, for example. While clothing fusibles are meant to stay secure during repeated washings and are water impervious, the fusing adhesives used on fusible quilt battings are intentionally water soluble, so that they may be washed out of your quilt, once the quilt has been quilted. When fusible battings are left in place, the finished quilt has more body, which some quilters prefer for display. But, for softness and ease of draping, the fusible adhesive is gently washed out in cold water, if the quilt is going to be used on a bed or comfortably wrapped around a loved one.

    So, to answer your questions, if you prewash a fusible quilt batt, the fusible adhesive will be washed out. The manufacturers have anticipated your concern over shrinkage, however, so cotton fusible batts are usually prewashed. Always good to check with the manufacturer, though, just to make sure. Fusible polyester batts don't shrink, so prewashing would not be necessary.

    As a Fine Arts Conservator who works with textiles in museums, I would be remiss not to mention that if you are investing your time and money into making a fine art heirloom quilt to last for many generations, not using any adhesive chemicals on your fine cotton fabrics and batting would be best. It is a rule of thumb that the fewer chemicals introduced into a textile, the longer it will last in appearance and structure. Pinning and basting are the best methods for museum quality quilted art or bed coverings. I am always happy to answer questions, if you think of something else. I can be reached at my Quilting Board Profile http://bit.ly/11hmYBV , on Twitter as @SunbonSmart or on Facebook http://on.fb.me/Z9rBMb , whatever's easiest for you. I love working with quilters! Much Love, Fondly, Robin
    Hi Robin,

    Many thanks for your reply. You brought up some points that I did not think of, and I really appreciate you taking the time to respond!
    Cheers,
    Ardyth

  9. #9
    Senior Member jetayre's Avatar
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    Welcome from Vermont near the Canadian Border. As you can already see - this is a great group for answers, cheers, and chat.

  10. #10
    Super Member Gladys's Avatar
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    Welcome from North Carolina! See lots of help already, these members are great!

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