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Thread: A different way to make postage stamp blocks

  1. #1
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    A different way to make postage stamp blocks

    I would never have thought of this, and it's going on my list of techniques to try: http://www.ohfransson.com/oh_fransso...he-block-.html
    We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.
    ~ Charles Kingsley

  2. #2
    Super Member Rose_P's Avatar
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    Name:  postageQuilt297.jpg
Views: 1329
Size:  239.9 KB Thought I'd try it. Right after I posted the link here, I realized that I already had a handy gridded ironing pad, some fusible interfacing(old, and I'm not sure it's the lightest weight) and a supply of 2" squares with no purpose in mind for them. It took me about an hour to make this piece which could become an ugly mug rug, but mostly served as a means of testing this technique. I think it was faster than sewing strips and it's easy to be quite accurate. It's ideal for using 2" squares that are already cut, where the strip piecing technique could not be used. The fusible stiffens the fabric some, but depending on what you're going to do with it, that might not be a problem.

    As I was working I realized that I could have kept going beyond the size of my mat by ironing only halfway across the last row and then moving it over and adding more rows. My mat was only wide enough for 5 squares, so I tested that and it works. If you want to go further than the width of your interfacing, you could also butt the next piece of fusible about midway through a row. It's not impossible, in other words, to do a huge quilt all in little squares using this technique.

    Another thought that crossed my mind is that it may be possible to use freezer paper instead of fusible web and remove it as you would in paper foundation piecing. This would - if it works - take care of my only objection, which is the extra stiffness. I like to make doll quilts, and the stiffness would be more noticeable in a small piece. It might not be a problem at all in a potholder, table mat or mug rug.

    If you make one, I hope you'll show us. Elizabeth Hartman of Oh, Fransson! gets credit for the tutorial.
    We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all we need to make us really happy is something to be enthusiastic about.
    ~ Charles Kingsley

  3. #3
    Super Member DianneK's Avatar
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    nice job, same method I use for watercolor
    May the scrap fairy visit your sewing room often

  4. #4
    Super Member fivepaws's Avatar
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    I've never seen this. Now I have to try it. Thank you.

  5. #5
    Super Member jitkaau's Avatar
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    A friend gave me a large piece of the squared material about 7 years ago and it is still sitting in the packaging. I have vowed to make something with it this year and intend to do lots of fussy cuts to make it more accurate than colour wash. I think postage stamps can be made easily without the expensive backing. It needs to be something special (for me) to warrant the extra cost.

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    Thank You. That is a good idea. I like what you made.
    Kindness is a language which the deaf can hear and the blind see.
    mark Twain

  7. #7
    Super Member MaryAnnMc's Avatar
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    I have learned so much from Elizabeth. Thanks for posting another one of her fantastic tutorials.
    aka Chicken McLittle

    If it's true we learn from our mistakes, I'm going to be a genius!

  8. #8
    Super Member AZ Jane's Avatar
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    You can purchase fusible with pre-drawn squares. Saw it at Jo-Ann's yesterday and wondered "what in the world"....
    Better to do something imperfectly, than nothing perfectly.
    Done is better than perfect.

  9. #9
    Power Poster
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    Looks great and a good way to use up those squares.

  10. #10
    BMP
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    Super Member BMP's Avatar
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    Thanks, I have wanted to make a postage stamp with all my scraps, I never thought of using the fusible grid.
    I have used it making the Mondo Bag , it was easy and quick.

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