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Thread: Fusible Applique'

  1. #1
    Member cmosey's Avatar
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    Friends,
    How do you feel about fusible applique'? I posted a blog article on my website http://blog.caronmosey.com

    and I'd love to know your thoughts. If you get a chance to read the article, please leave a comment at the bottom of the article so others can read and reply.

    Thanks!
    Caron Mosey

    Feathered Cheddar in Progress
    Name:  Attachment-108306.jpe
Views: 56
Size:  72.3 KB

  2. #2
    Senior Member Baysidegal's Avatar
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    All good points. I guess thats why so many of us are still taking lessons or at the very least feel that there is always something to learn. In this day and age some of us do not have the time (or patience) to hand quilt, or follow tried and true methods of quilting. Maybe some of us want instant gratification. Whatever the reason, quilting, as some of you know it, is going to mean different things to different people. I say, whatever lessons you can learn and apply to your craft is to be admired and praised. Whatever we can take away from someone's "tute" is another "lesson learned".

  3. #3
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    i use it alot for my wall hangings and things i know won't get washed. things that will get washed will be hand app. i didn't know the stuff existed till about 20 yrs ago

  4. #4
    Super Member catrancher's Avatar
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    This is the only way I do applique, but I do not leave the edges raw. I use a machine blanket stitch on every exposed edge, or I stitch very close to the edge with a regular straight stitch. I'm not sure what will happen when these are washed because I've never washed one, but I really don't care. My quilts are intended to be loved and used, not to be stuffed in a cedar chest to be handed down to generations of cedar chests.

    When I see someone bemoaning the possibility that an older technique will be lost, I understand the concern. But there are so many techniques that are lost to us and not missed in the slightest (at least I've never heard anyone complain).

    I know a few weavers of cloth, but it's an artistic pursuit, not a necessity. I don't know anyone (and nobody I know knows anyone) who spins their own thread any more. Does anyone care? The point I'm making is that if a technique is loved enough, it will be saved if only for artistic purposes. And if no one loves it enough to do it even as art, then is there a real loss?

    Some time I might like to learn to do needle turn applique, and if I do, I feel confident I can teach myself from the many fine texts available. I've taught myself everything I know about quilting (although someone taught me to use a rotary cutter). I just chose some books that were readily available online. As long as the printed page exists, we will have the option of learning or re-learning to do any technique that anyone thought worthy or writing down. And if nobody wrote it down, then I wonder how valuable it was in the first place. And even if the printed page ceases to exist, there will be a computer somewhere that still contains the information.

  5. #5
    Super Member misseva's Avatar
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    i've not had a lot of success with fused applique - guess i'm not doing something right... anyway - i like to do either needle turn or regular applique.

  6. #6
    Dee
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    Super Member Dee's Avatar
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    I don't use it. My experience with it was not a good one.

  7. #7
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    I've used it and had no problems with it. If they had had fusible 100 years ago, I bet they would have used it.

  8. #8
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    I find this an interesting issue. I DO know someone who spins their own thread/yarn, I have no idea how to machine quilt (handquilting only as of yet) and have only done needle turned applique on big quilts.

    I'm thinking about using fusible applique with machine blanket stitching on some placemats that I fully expect to be destroyed. I guess that is why I'm thinking about the fusible in the first place. It appears to be "easier" and faster. I'm sure many people are going to really disagree with me on this one.

  9. #9
    fraserblack's Avatar
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    I use fusible web all the time and I do a heap of applique quilts. I also blanket stitch around all the edges to permanently hold the applique in place. All the quilts have been washed as most are baby quilts and "accidents" happen. I have never had a problem with it. I learned needle turn applique but find the fusible method much more satisfying and the results are great.

  10. #10
    Senior Member barbrdunn's Avatar
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    I have done alot of applique,both needle turn and fusible. I have not had problems with the fusible and think they are actually stronger for children's quilts than needle turned as long as they are either buttonhole stitched or satin stitched. The only dislike I have is that they can be stiff. They do soften up after several washings, but are still not soft. My solution is to starch the heck out of both the backing and the applique and then position the applique with a glue stick. I then use a satin stitch without a stabilizer. I did that recently on a baby quilt that has been washed over and over and is holding up well. And it is soft and cuddly.

    Before it was bound
    Name:  Attachment-109643.jpe
Views: 57
Size:  82.0 KB

    Closeup of the applique
    Name:  Attachment-109719.jpe
Views: 56
Size:  56.1 KB

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