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Thread: Help keep quilt artist in the US

  1. #11
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    ...sorry I cannot "sign" the petition.......I have mixed feelings and several questions about her story and her "working" here........she has an American lawyer so I am sure so she will be in Denver shortly........and the employee at the Embassy will still have her job too....

  2. #12
    Super Member quiltmom04's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri B View Post
    ...sorry I cannot "sign" the petition.......I have mixed feelings and several questions about her story and her "working" here........she has an American lawyer so I am sure so she will be in Denver shortly........and the employee at the Embassy will still have her job too....
    Yes, after reading this post I decided to do some research, too. Turns out she's been living here for years. From what I could discern, artist visas are given for a period of time, not for whether the government employee likes someone's work. Here's what her website says:

    "I am one of the owners of the co-operative The Courtyard Gallery in Buena Vista CO www.thecourtyardgallery.com. I was President of the Arkansas Valley Arts Center for 4 years www.avacgallery.com and also show my work at Gallery 150 Salida CO. In January 2011 I became the co-rep for SAQA for the Rocky Mountain Region along with Liz Kettle and we have already worked on curating a number of shows for SAQA www.saqa.com . This is a very exciting opportunity."

    To me that doesn't sound like her work has been dismissed, or that she has not had an opportunity to make a living in the United States. I would imagine there are a lot of cranky government employees, but I'm guessing they can't make up the rules if they are having a bad day. Does anyone know the real story?

  3. #13
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    Maybe England is not ready to export her to our shores! Good luck with the petition.

  4. #14
    Senior Member QuiltingCrazie's Avatar
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    Good luck to her, I agree become a citizen if you want the benefits, for an American to live in the UK would be no different. Can't have it both ways, I know lots of people go to the US to make money, get an education or to just better their opportunities but in the end the US owes its loyalty to its citizens.
    *Rachel*

  5. #15
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    The visa folk are also leather-headed about other folks who are here on their parents' visa and who are now American Citizens. A friend of mine spent two years trying to make a person in Miami understand that when they emigrated, children did not need a separate passport, etc., especially if they were very young. It took numerous calls to Wash. DC to "educate" the person who kept denying her and kept changing the paperwork she needed. Sheesh!

  6. #16
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    Done. I don't understand it either.

  7. #17
    Senior Member llong0233's Avatar
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    I don't agree. I do agree it is unfair for a single immigration individual to subjectively reject an applicant because she doesn't think fabric art is "art". I hope this situation has been exaggerated to make a point and not entirely true. If there are universal rules for artists to immigrate to the U.S., and they are followed universally, then so be it. The situation, as it's described, doesn't sound fair. I would want all the facts, without the emotion, before signing any petition. And, while the Colorado landscape can be inspiring, the U.K. also has some fabulous landscape. Surely Kate can see the beauty in, and be inspired by, that landscape of her birth? For most artists doesn't the inspiration come from inside? Everyone who wants to live in the U.S. can't live here. There's just not enough room Liking the Colorado landscape doesn't seem like reason enough to grant a long-term visa.
    Quilting Makes Me Happy...

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