Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Innovative Applique'

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Mount Vernon Ohio
    Posts
    94

    Innovative Applique'

    New way of doing Applique' She has great patterns of flowers!
    www.sewforever.com

  2. #2
    Super Member DianneK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Liberty, Pa
    Posts
    1,645
    thank you...will give it a try

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    984
    I find this method works better if you use a glue stick (very lightly) because it has more initial tack than the liquid (and less volume)..you really don't want to use as much glue as she has shown here. If you want to use liquid glue i would suggest applying it lightly with a paintbrush. IMHO

  4. #4
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Grundy Co Illinois
    Posts
    5,328
    I like the idea of using the freezer paper on the right side of the fabric to keep the fabric firm while turning the edge under. I've not had good luck with the method where the freezer paper is on the wrong side. This way make much more sense. I'm working on a project now with some needle turn and I think I'm going to have to give this method a try!!

    thanks to Steady ... I think I'll try it with my glue stick first.

    Thanks for that link!!
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  5. #5
    Super Member DogHouseMom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Grundy Co Illinois
    Posts
    5,328
    Step one done ... I've got my pieces cut and ready to sew.

    It was easier for me to turn the edges and iron the edge down with the freezer paper on the right side of the fabric. It's not perfect ... but it was easier - and quicker. I think that the edges that are not "perfect" I might be able to correct when I sew it.

    I did not like the glue stick. It was easier to use, but because I wanted to iron the edge down I preferred the wet glue. Glue stick doesn't hold as well after it's been ironed. I might try another piece with the glue stick and NOT iron the edge.

    I still snipped my curves. I also found that it was much easier to glue/iron the curved edges first, then work the straighter edges last.

    BTW - I've got three pieces of a butterfly that I am sewing. The smallest (the body) is 2" long by 1/2" wide.

    OK .. ready to go sew!!! Wish me luck
    May your stitches always be straight, your seams always lie flat, and your grain never be biased against you.

    Sue

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    129
    I tried the Shabby Fabrics method of using spray starch, a paint brush, and my clover iron. Worked for me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Janquiltz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Peoria Arizona
    Posts
    698
    Blog Entries
    1
    About 4-5 years ago, I took a class at Quilt Camp in the Pines with Martha A. Nordstrand. Instead of the freezer paper on the front of the fabric pattern we used the pattern drawn on and then cut from the full sheet label papers. We used either the Roxanne Basting Glue or a Elmers glue stick and instead of working on our cutting mat, we used a cheap cutting board. Instead of a very pointy seam ripper to fold over and hold the glued fabric down, we used small straight screw drivers. then give you a larger area to fold over and hold down and the side of the screw driver is pointy if you need an even smaller area to press down. The advantage of using this method is that you can prepare all of your applique pieces at one time, and then as you assemble your pattern you use just a small amount of glue stick to hold it in place. Once you have glued all the pieces to your whole applique design you can put it away (if you choose) and it will hold together for years. I just need to applique about 7 tiny berries down and I will have finished doing the applique part of a beautiful fall wreath (with a robin sitting on a branch in the center of the wreath. I will upload a photo - hopefully tomorrow.) Another advantage is that you can get wonderful points too. A few hints...try to not get glue in the fold area; try to position your pieces where you won't have to sew through two or more glued surfaces; If you applique with batiks (they are perfect for appliquing) wash and press them first (no spray starch). If you do have to sew through two or more glued areas - take a small brush, dip it in water and soak the part of the piece that you are trying to applique through. It softens things enough to allow you to complete your stitches, yet continues to hold its shape. Sorry to go on for so long. I am just so pleased with the way this fall wreath looks - just had to share a few things that I learned by doing. Oh yes - it doesn't really matter where you start appliquing on something with multiple pieces/multiple layers - just pick a spot and go for it!
    Jan

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.