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Thread: $1000 machine isn't good?

  1. #1
    Junior Member Cheshire Cat's Avatar
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    Question $1000 machine isn't good?

    So I went to the county fair. There was a sewing shop booth there. They had a lot of nice machines. I am on my third. My first was a cheaper Brother. Work for a short while. My second was a Pfaff, only $200 but for me that was a lot. My third is a Singer Quilter's confidence. I paid just under $300. It lacks power over seams but solid for all the basics.

    I'm expecting a little money so I asked them what is the best machine I can get for $1000. They show me a nice computerize Husqvarna. Pretty red details. I've played with Janomes as well. The features include decorative stitches not very different from my Singer but less variety, footless control and an automatic presser foot; lowers and raises itself. Nice features but this is the only real difference. She tells me that $1000 really won't get me a good machine. That $4000 is really what I should shoot for.

    I'm thinking for a $1000 I should get enough power to slide over pinwheels and prairie points, the push button cut, more stitches, and footless control.

    I sew about 8 to 10 quilts a year on my little Singer. It groans some over the thicker seams but I get them through. I make throw to queen size mostly. I have machine quilted a few but prefer to have them professionally quilted. Am I asking for too much for my $1000? Really?
    "The desire to create is one of the deepest yearnings of the human soul. No matter our talents, education, backgrounds, or abilities, we each have an inherent wish to create something that did not exist before." ~Dieter F. Uchtdor

  2. #2
    Power Poster lynnie's Avatar
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    I feel your pain.

  3. #3
    Super Member Candace's Avatar
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    You should ask your dealer about gently used machines. You may get more on your wish list.

  4. #4
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    No,not really. You can get a nice machine for under $1000. the best machine for you is the one that will meet your needs. some machines have more bells and whistles but you don't have to have them to do nice work.

  5. #5
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheshire Cat View Post
    So I went to the county fair. There was a sewing shop booth there. They had a lot of nice machines. I am on my third. My first was a cheaper Brother. Work for a short while. My second was a Pfaff, only $200 but for me that was a lot. My third is a Singer Quilter's confidence. I paid just under $300. It lacks power over seams but solid for all the basics.

    I'm expecting a little money so I asked them what is the best machine I can get for $1000. They show me a nice computerize Husqvarna. Pretty red details. I've played with Janomes as well. The features include decorative stitches not very different from my Singer but less variety, footless control and an automatic presser foot; lowers and raises itself. Nice features but this is the only real difference. She tells me that $1000 really won't get me a good machine. That $4000 is really what I should shoot for.
    Yeah, and make sure you buy it from HER! Seriously, you should be able to find a wonderful machine, for $1000.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  6. #6
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    I was in your situation needing a more 'heavy duty' machine. My dealer first asked me what features where high priority and what I was willing to spend. She demo'd an Elna and it has been the perfect machine for me. I suggest you find another dealer that can help you find a machine that works for both you and your budget. BTW, I think you should be able to find a nice machine for $1000 Good luck!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Skyangel's Avatar
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    You may want to consider getting a vintage metal machine for piecing and going over those seams. Keep your Singer for those decorative stitches and extra features. A vintage Singer 401 or even a straight-stitch-only 201 would have all the power you would need for heavier piecing. And at a lot less than $1000 to buy it and have it completely refurbished.

  8. #8
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    There is no need to spend $4000 on a machine. I had a $3000 Bernina that I actaully sold because it had so many features I did not need or use. I sold it and bought a Bernina that cost only $700 and it serves my purpose well. My main features that I amke sure I have are: Needle Up/Needle down, authomatic needle threader, being able to move the needle to the left or to the right so I can position it where I want it, and I like a machine that works good with the walking foot. All the other feathers are useless to me and when you are buying a $4000 machine, you are paying for all those other feathers that you may not use, so make sure to look at the $1000 machines and get one of those if it has all the features you feel you need. Good luck and do not feel bad about only spending $1000 on a mcahine. There's alot of really nice machines, in all brands, available to buy for $1000 or less.
    Last edited by aborning; 09-05-2012 at 03:17 PM.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Cheshire Cat's Avatar
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    I have an antique Singer 201 that my uncle gave me. I have never used it. I guess because I think of it as an antique rather than a working machine. I should give it a try. Thanks ladies for your encouragement.
    "The desire to create is one of the deepest yearnings of the human soul. No matter our talents, education, backgrounds, or abilities, we each have an inherent wish to create something that did not exist before." ~Dieter F. Uchtdor

  10. #10
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    The Singer 201 is ***the*** vintage Singer to have for quilting! It's a workhorse of a machine and highly desirable among collectors and quilters. Parts are still available for it, and it's an easy machine to maintain and repair. Lucky you!!!

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