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Thread: Acid Free Fabric Storage

  1. #1
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    Acid Free Fabric Storage

    I see lots of comments about not using cardboard bolts because they are not acid free. What is your experience with this? How long does fabric have to stay in contact with an acid surface before it is affected? And what is the effect? I've decided not to worry about this issue. Isn't the purpose of owning this fabric to use it, not store it? I'll take my chances and if the fabric that is close to a non-acid surface becomes unusable, I'll use the portion that is good and go shopping for what I'm short. and speaking of short - am I being short sighted?

  2. #2
    Super Member hopetoquilt's Avatar
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    I buy just enough fabric for each project. Any leftovers get cut into the Bonnie Hunter scrap saver system. I don't store anything. The only exception is one piece of 5 yards of really cool fabric that I haven't decided what to do with but had to have.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
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    I can't tell you what current fabric on bolts can be stored, But I had a bolt of muslin stored on the original bolt for 15 years without any damage.

  4. #4
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    it really depends on circumstances- if you are in a humid climate & your fabric becomes damp with humidity- and is left on something that is (acid-y) it may discolor- or mildew- but under normal circumstances it takes a long time for any effect- it is more important if storing a quilt- that is an heirloom that is put away for an extended period of time to pay attention to how you store it- your fabric that will be moved around- (aired) on a fairly regular basis is going to be fine.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  5. #5
    Super Member paulswalia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori S View Post
    I can't tell you what current fabric on bolts can be stored, But I had a bolt of muslin stored on the original bolt for 15 years without any damage.
    See, this has been my experience too. And I work in a LQS and there's some fabric that's been on bolts for about 3 years without any damage. So what's all the hoopla about?

  6. #6
    Moderator QuiltnNan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopetoquilt View Post
    I buy just enough fabric for each project. Any leftovers get cut into the Bonnie Hunter scrap saver system. I don't store anything. The only exception is one piece of 5 yards of really cool fabric that I haven't decided what to do with but had to have.
    i love your thinking on this! however, i already have a stash that may not get used up in my lifetime
    i ruler fold mine and store on shelves out of the light.
    Nancy in western NY

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulswalia View Post
    See, this has been my experience too. And I work in a LQS and there's some fabric that's been on bolts for about 3 years without any damage. So what's all the hoopla about?
    It's probably someone who wants to make a fast buck...instilling fear in quilters if they don't by the acid free boards their stash will be garbage....heck who in one's lifetime is going to use every bit of fabric they have....

  8. #8
    Junior Member Donna in Mo's Avatar
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    I am with you on this one. I started cutting foam board to store my fabric but after three sheets I decided it was too expensive. I don't think the fabric I store is so expensive that I have to worry about it. And, cardboard is free!

  9. #9
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    I agree with the idea of a stash, but why would you want to have fabric for an extended length of time/Like 2-4 years. A&E has a Horders show like this......

  10. #10
    Super Member Deb watkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deb watkins View Post
    I agree with the idea of a stash, but why would you want to have fabric for an extended length of time/Like 2-4 years. A&E has a Horders show like this......
    Oh Deb, you are so insentive to those of us who have a fabric fetish.....we ALL have fabric that we just love and yet can't bear to cut because it is so beautiful....but realisitically - holding on to fabric for such a lengthy period of time....remember those of us who held onto those beautiful (?) polyesters......yeah.....where did the eventually end up?

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