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Thread: Another Batting Question

  1. #1
    Power Poster MadQuilter's Avatar
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    Another Batting Question

    Hi fellow quilters, I am normally a Warm Product Batting user. (Warm & Natural, Warm & White, Warm Blend) but I am going to quilt a bed quilt for a friend in ccccccold Washington State. (I've seen the pictures with tons of snow.)

    My friend lives in a house that is an energy hog and she keeps the heater as low as possible to keep the cost down. The main part of the house is heated by wood stove but I understand that the bedrooms are ....nippy.

    To me, W&N does not give enough support under those conditions and I'm looking for an alternative. I hear that wool is a warmer option but I have never worked with wool batting before.

    What other options would you recommend for a comfy-cozy warm Washington quilt?
    Martina
    Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Fabric!

  2. #2
    Power Poster
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    Maybe a fleece batting would work. I'll be watching this thread to see the other suggestions. BrendaK
    Be kind to yourself, by being kind to others. When you help others you help yourself.

  3. #3
    Super Member EasyPeezy's Avatar
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    I live up north and I use Warm in all my quilts. When it gets really really
    cold (think -30C) I double my quilts.

  4. #4
    Super Member ube quilting's Avatar
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    Use a combination or double up he batting you like. I have never done this but it is a common practice.
    no act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. Aesop

  5. #5
    Power Poster PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    Michigan gets pretty cold too. I would vote for wool. It is very easy to work with and has a higher loft than W&N, so your quilting shows up more. Use a nice flannel for the back. I personally don't like the way that fleece doesn't breathe, but this doesn't bother a lot of folks.
    Last edited by PaperPrincess; 04-13-2017 at 04:52 PM.
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  6. #6
    Super Member wesing's Avatar
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    We used a Cotton batting and fleece back for my F-I-L's quilt and it is very warm. It also (machine) quilted very nicely.

  7. #7
    Senior Member sewingitalltogether's Avatar
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    I love wool.

  8. #8
    Super Member quiltingshorttimer's Avatar
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    wool--it's delightful to work with, breathes so you never sweat under a very warm quilt. I doubled it on a winter quilt that I did for the g-son to use at our house in a room that can feel pretty chill when we've had a fire in fireplace downstairs. It still was lightweight feeling and very toasty.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    I grew up in the Arctic, in a wood-heated house. When it's cold, one quilt won't be enough no matter what batting you use. Here are three options I would recommend:

    1. Use Warm and Natural, with a flannel backing. The flannel makes it warmer, and keeps the quilt from sliding around if she layers multiple blankets/quilts.

    2. Wool would be even warmer, or a layer of wool with a layer of W&N.

    3. Warmest of all would be to make the quilt, then attach an extra back to turn it into a duvet cover. As long as she isn't allergic to feathers, a heavy feather or down duvet is the only single-blanket way to stay warm in a really cold bedroom. If you quilt the top like usual, it can also be used just as a quilt in warmer weather.

    Whatever you choose, I'm sure your friend will appreciate it!

  10. #10
    Super Member
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    We had a very unusual winter in Washington! I keep the heat down and use a thin quilt plus a double fleece blanket, which is usually on the floor by morning. I run kind of warm, though!
    Margaret F

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