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Thread: Antique Quilts

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Netherlands, The Hague
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    I'm busy repairing old quilt tops or old quilt blocks, to make "new" quilts of them, just for myself (not for sale or anything else). Just because I like those old quilts. I'm very enthousiastic about it. I have no experience, I just try and see how it works out. Are there more quilters who have experience, and what do you do?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    847
    I repaired one once for a childhood friend's father. It was made in the 1950s and partially in tatters....huge open areas. The backing was holding it all together. Luckily it was Xmas time and I found the exact shade of green that is only available at that time of year. The rest was white muslin and butter yellow. I made templates from the intact blocks and replaced the missing chunks of batting etc. It looked brand new almost when I was done, they said. It was very time consuming but I was glad to do it for them. They were very nice to me during my difficult childhood. Maybe after (if) I retire I'd do it again. Antique quilts amaze me. No fancy tools like we have yet their's are better than mine alot of the time....lol

  3. #3
    Super Member Oklahoma Suzie's Avatar
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    Aug 2008
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    Home town: Rehoboth, MA Now living in OK
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    have never done one, would love to see some pics.

  4. #4
    Senior Member TeresaT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Southwest Arkansas
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    518
    I have an antique quilt I got at a yard sale for 2.00. It is pretty well worn. I don't know if it is repairable or not but I couldn't leave it lying there knowing all the work that had gone into it when it was made.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Netherlands, The Hague
    Posts
    9
    Hi, yes you're lucky that you can find old quilts at garage-sale. In the Netherlands it would be completely impossible. This year I was lucky when I was in Seattle at my friend Marne, we were at a show where I found 2 quilttops. Last months I bought some quilt blocks and tops on e-bay and send them to my friend Marne. I think it's really nice to turn those quilts into "new" quilts. I just try, and see how it works out. I'm only a quilter for 3,5 year, I don't have any special background on this subject. I just try. bye bye Caro

  6. #6
    Super Member Boston1954's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    East Oklahoma - pining for Massachusetts
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    5,890
    Quote Originally Posted by fabric-holic
    I repaired one once for a childhood friend's father. It was made in the 1950s and partially in tatters....huge open areas. The backing was holding it all together. Luckily it was Xmas time and I found the exact shade of green that is only available at that time of year. The rest was white muslin and butter yellow. I made templates from the intact blocks and replaced the missing chunks of batting etc. It looked brand new almost when I was done, they said. It was very time consuming but I was glad to do it for them. They were very nice to me during my difficult childhood. Maybe after (if) I retire I'd do it again. Antique quilts amaze me. No fancy tools like we have yet their's are better than mine alot of the time....lol
    Now you have my full attention...........I must see some pictures. Please tell me that you took some.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    847
    (hanging my head in shame....) no I didn't take any pics. I wasn't doing that then (in fact I still don't, at least not all the time.)
    I'm not trying to pat myself on the back but it really was a mess.
    Her father didn't want to throw it out, he slept with it on his bed every night because it reminded him of her mother (his wife) who'd died.
    They asked me if I'd try to fix it so I did. It took all winter but I got it done.
    He just recently died too and that quilt was on his bed till the end.

  8. #8
    Super Member quilt addict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,489
    I have an attachment to old quilts. i have purchased some that need help. I haven't gotten to it. I hope to learn some repair techniques when i get to it. Most of them are in such bad shape they are not really worth the time or effort if you were interested in monetary return. I agree though that they should be loved and if they can be saved with alittle work and you will love them when done, why not do it?

    Good luck and look forward to pictures.

  9. #9
    Super Member jljack's Avatar
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    Apr 2007
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    Central CA - But otherwise, NOTW
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilt addict
    I have an attachment to old quilts. i have purchased some that need help. I haven't gotten to it. I hope to learn some repair techniques when i get to it. Most of them are in such bad shape they are not really worth the time or effort if you were interested in monetary return. I agree though that they should be loved and if they can be saved with alittle work and you will love them when done, why not do it?

    Good luck and look forward to pictures.
    I feel exactly the same about old quilts...most of the ones I have need some repair, and as soon as I get some time (when????) I'll be working on them. They are in OK shape, good enough for the grandkids to sit on the floor or take a nap under, or to take in the car, so I can't stand to throw them out or see someone else discard them. I have 4 of those, plus one that's in very good condition, and one other that's kind of special, and I posted some info on it in another thread...
    http://www.quiltingboard.com/t-41762-1.htm
    This is a green and red quilt from the 1880s that I will be fixing up. You can read the thread. Some really good suggestions for fixing old quilts.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    76
    I inherited an old (from the early 1900s that no one in the family wanted) family coverlet that has quilt blocks on both sides with no batting and a scalloped unlined edging hemmed with a very coarse thread. The edging is not in very good condition and the coverlet is soiled. I am planning to try and get rid of the soilage with BIZ. I don't plan to try and correct the edging. I was told that it was used during the summer when heavy quilts were tucked away and a cover was needed for the bed. Also for a donation to my church, I recovered a 1930s quilt top (per appraisal) which my pastor was using for a copy machine cover (horrors) My daughter now is keeping it as an heirloom.

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