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Thread: Applique Help

  1. #1
    Junior Member LittleMo's Avatar
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    I am making a large piece star with a 5" centre. What would be the best way to attached the centre in the middle. I would like it to be invisible, and professional looking.

    Would the freezer paper method work on such a large piece?

    I have tried twice to machine stitch it to the star but it has been a failure each time. Here's a pic, if it helps.

    TIA
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  2. #2
    Super Member dakotamaid's Avatar
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    Here is what I would do. I would run a thread around the circle. than lay it on a cardboard template the size of the finished circle, pull the thread up to bring the fabric edges over the cardboard template. Turn over and press, then remove the cardboard and applique on by hand. Clear as mud?

  3. #3
    Junior Member LittleMo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dakotamaid
    Here is what I would do. I would run a thread around the circle. than lay it on a cardboard template the size of the finished circle, pull the thread up to bring the fabric edges over the cardboard template. Turn over and press, then remove the cardboard and applique on by hand. Clear as mud?
    Thanks for that, but thats about as far as I have gone. If I stitch it by machine, it puckers. I suppose my real question is how do I get it NOT to pucker. Will the freezer paper prevent the puckers?

  4. #4
    Super Member mimom's Avatar
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    I would leave the freezer paper on the right side of the fabric, it will keep the circle flat and go ahead and sew by hand. You can use Elmers washable stick glue to keep the circle in place until you are finished sewing.

  5. #5
    Super Member Charming's Avatar
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    First of all it looks so beautiful. Now to business, whatever you are doing seems just fine to me that's how i do it and it doesn't pucker at all. Are you sure you are using the walking foot because i am not sure if i am seeing this right but looks like the star points are layered! Is there a thick layer of pieces (adjust the tension to match the thickness) Also you might want to try the 1/4" steam a seam roll I use that a lot to turn edges so i can sew easily. I am really a beginner at all that but i try whatever it works and make my work look nice :oops:

  6. #6
    Super Member CoriAmD's Avatar
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    When stitching around a circle, I take a few stitches, stop, lift the pressure foot, turn put pressure foot down and sew few more.... continuing on until I have gone all around the circle. Are you doing this, if not, maybe this is causing the puckers? Just a thought

  7. #7
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    What a beautiful block!!
    I also would leave the freezer paper in while appliqueing, and
    either applique it by hand, or with an invisible thread by machine with
    a very narrow stitch..either a narrow zigzag or if you have it a blind hem stitch. Make sure the circle is either hand basted in place, or use many pins to position so it doesn't move while you are appliqueing it.

  8. #8
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    I'd start by drawing a 5" circle on the back of a square of yellow fabric. Lay it face down on a piece of lightweight fabric like muslin (or you could use a used dryer fabric softener sheet if you want to be "green"). Sew the two together by stitching on your drawn line.

    Cut a 2" to 3" slit in your backing fabric and turn the circle right-side out. Press carefully - you may want to use a knitting needle or something else with a blunt-point end to help smooth out the seam line so that it forms a nice circle.

    Pin or glue (using a wash-out glue such as Elmer's) the circle into the desired position on your block. I'd probably hand-stitch it at this point, but you can machine stitch if you're careful and lift your presser foot and gently reposition the block every few stitches.

    This method adds a layer of fabric to help give it a bit more stability while you're sewing. Also, the additional layer helps prevent the darker colors of your star from showing through the circle.

    Good luck!

  9. #9
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
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    Pretty block! :)

    I would use the starch method to prepare that circle - with no-melt mylar instead of freezer paper.

    Your pieces are as crisp as potato chips when you're done with them, but they sew beautifully by hand. The main benefits of the starch method is that the pieces are very precise and smooth around the edges - no little pointy things at the folds. The mylar is easy to remove and you just give the folds another quick little press to get them back in shape. You can glue-baste them down (keep the glue away from the line where you're going to stitch, because it's hard to get a needle through the dried glue) and sew them precisely.

    I haven't made one yet, but I think that precision is kind of the biggie with a Mariner's Compass block, isn't it?

    If you use tiny stitches and a very fine thread (I like Bottom Line by Superior) the sewing will be invisible. :)

  10. #10
    Super Member cuppi duke's Avatar
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    Yes the freezer paper helps prevent puckers and makes your project a lot easier, especially for circles. You could also try the back basting method.

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