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Thread: Assembly Question

  1. #1
    Member curlytop's Avatar
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    Help--I'm new to quilting and wanting to make a quilt for each of my grandchildren. My goal is to make a king-size quilt using blocks related to the states we have visited with each of them on vacation. We visited 8 states with our grandson and 9 plus Washington, DC with our granddaughter. I'm thinking I can also make some blocks from pictures we took on our trips. Based on what I've read, a king-size type requires 49 blocks, so I'm not sure how to come up with the 49 blocks. Is this too lofty a plan for a starter? I've collected block patterns, but have been reluctant to purchase fabric until I have a better idea what I'm doing! Any guidance or suggested references would be GREATLY appreciated!

    Curlytop310

  2. #2
    Super Member gale's Avatar
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    If you make the blocks bigger, you can make it with less of them. However, if I was new I would try to tackle a few lap size quilts first before attempting a king size.

  3. #3
    Senior Member quilter1943's Avatar
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    Absolutely too much. I've made 3 or 4 king sized quilts and it's a lot. Maybe do some snuggle quilts (40 x 60 or longer if they are taller) and you'll see a finished product a lot quicker. A king size quilt gets terribly boring, or at least I think it does.
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    If you make the blocks bigger, you can make it with less of them. However, if I was new I would try to tackle a few lap size quilts first before attempting a king size.

  4. #4
    MTS
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    So you know how big a king size quilt is, right? You've laid one out on the floor to really grasp the dimensions? Look at what you're going to be wrangling through your little domestic sewing machine? Or, if not you, then how much you'll be paying someone with a long arm to quilt it? Know how much that costs? Per quilt?

    Now, I really didn't mean to terrify you. ;-) ;-)

    A king size is about 95"x95" (more or less). So if you have some plan for 49 blocks, that's a 7x7 layout, which would mean each block is approx 13.5 inches finished.

    Are these little grandkids - why would they need a king size? Or adults? Because if you make a king-sized quilt, you're basically expecting it to go in the master bedroom, and personally, I think that's a bit presumptuous. Maybe it's not their decor, or the SO really isn't going to be thrilled.

    So how about a wall hanging or a throw for the couch? That's much more manageable, and useful. And they'll be better able to show it off. You can mix and match photo blocks with pieced blocks.

    But if you want it to be a memory quilt, and because you're new, I'd go with a wall hanging/couch quilt first. That's definitely doable.

    Actually, I really like the idea of wallhanging, say 36x 48. You can get experience piecing, printing photos, joining block into rows, putting borders on, and possibly even quilting it yourself without being totally overwhelmed.

    And, for full disclosure, my first quilt was king sized. Know where it is now? In a bag in a box in a closet in the storage room. Unfinished.

  5. #5
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    King size can be overwwhelming,,, seems like you will never get done,,, reconsider your block size if you do. Decide to make it

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilter1943
    Absolutely too much. I've made 3 or 4 king sized quilts and it's a lot. Maybe do some snuggle quilts (40 x 60 or longer if they are taller) and you'll see a finished product a lot quicker. A king size quilt gets terribly boring, or at least I think it does.
    Quote Originally Posted by gale
    If you make the blocks bigger, you can make it with less of them. However, if I was new I would try to tackle a few lap size quilts first before attempting a king size.
    I would decide on a block for each state based on your trip. I would make one smaller quilt for your grandson and one for your granddaughter that represent each of your trips.

    When you make each of the blocks, make two. One you have each of the smaller quilts for the grandchildren made then you can put together all of the blocks into a quilt for yourself. When you get to yours you will be better at working on the larger size quilt.

    Pam M

  7. #7
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    I agree that you should start out smaller. If the children are very young they need something small enough to be able to drag around. If they are teens a twin size would be great for them to take away to college or their first apartment. After 911 I made three memory quilts for a family whose father was killed in the towers. Their mother sent me pictures of them with their father and items of his clothing. I made fabric photo tranfers of the pictures and incorportated pieces of the clothins into each lap size quilt. I also made each child a throw size pillow with a picture of them and their father on it. There were other quilters nationwide doing similar projects.
    If you try and make king size quilts for each of the children you will burn yourself out and may end up wasting a lot of time and money.

  8. #8
    Super Member hobbykat1955's Avatar
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    I agree with all the above...too big to start off with. And chances are it will end up in your unfinished pile...you'll give up on quilting. Start small...

  9. #9
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    It would be best to start out with a lap size quilt for the first time.

  10. #10
    Super Member quiltmaker's Avatar
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    Oh my what a question....I have made many many king sized quilts and mine were basically 120X122 (really large) as I preferred a certain look on my bed. For a new quilter this could prove to be very daunting. I would personally start with a throw or twin size to build my confidence and reap the rewards sooner. It takes a long time to make a king size and you might become frustrated just at the sheer size of it. Once you are confident you can then start making those king sized quilts for your grandchildren. Whatever you decide to do just take your time and enjoy the process!

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