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Thread: Backing a quilt???

  1. #1

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    Sep 2008
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    Hi all!
    I'm working on my first non-rag quilt, and its very simple...just squares...and I get how to sew them together, but I don't get how to do the quilt sandwich, or the backing or any of that....because I'm thinking I can't just sew wrong sides together and turn right side out, because theres the darn batting...and I can't just sew it normal because all my raw edges would be hanging out...I'm sure this a dumb question, but I'm new to sewing and especially quilting! :oops: and then there is the whole "stitch in the ditch?" I should probably just take a class...but I don't have the time! THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR ANY HELP! :mrgreen:

  2. #2
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    How big is your quilt?

  3. #3

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    When I make a raggedy quilt, I cut my squares at 9" (arbitrary) and my batting at 7". Layer your 3 pieces (batting wrong side up, batting and top right side up) draw diagonal lines and stitch. Then, when you sew the pieces together, put them wrong sides together and stitch 1" seams. When you are all done, clip your seams about 1/4" apart then wash and dry.

  4. #4
    Senior Member QuiltinLee's Avatar
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    Maybe I'm reading the post wrong but it seems to me that you're asking how to make a quilt "sandwich". If I'm wrong, just ignore me. I tend to blather.

    First thing is to IRON. Iron your backing and top. Put your back down wrong side up (use a table, floor, whatever). Make sure it has all wrinkles out. Clamp it down, tape it down, tack it down, any method that will keep the backing from shifting on you.

    Put your batting down next. A lot of people put their batting in the dryer for a few minutes to get the wrinkles out, your choice. But make sure when you lay it out that you do not have any wrinkles (wrinkles are like a deadly sin and will fowl up your world). You can adjust this over your backing so that you get the "right" fit (which is why you tacked down the backing - you don't have to keep adjusting the backing then) Once I get the backing down where I want it, I pin the corners in place, but maybe that's just me.

    The next step is to lay out your quilt top. Figure out the middle and put it on top of the batting right side up on the middle of the batting. Again, get your deadly wrinkles out. Then just pin your quilt to stabilize your sandwich. I usually pin about 2" apart.

    Some people use a spray when they put their layers together. Your choice.

    Yes, at this stage you will have raw edges. After you finish quilting, the you put on a binding and voila, no more raw edges!

    As for "stitch in a ditch" goes, I never could get the hang of that. I ended up getting a foot for my machine that does the stitch in a ditch. That and my 1/4" foot were my best investments!

    Hope this answers your questions.

  5. #5
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
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    http://www.purlbee.com/hand-vs-machi...-sandwich.html

    http://litandlaundry.blogspot.com/20...-sandwich.html

    the above links show how to make the quilt sandwich and the second is demonstrating the sandwich plus pin basting. some people baste with thread and needle.
    hope this helps. good luck with your project.

  6. #6
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
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    you're so good quiltinlee. Follow quiltinlee's instructions but if you are visual, check the second link i posted to see it in action.
    happy sewing.

  7. #7

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    Ok I totally misread that one!! It's early and too much/not enough coffee.

  8. #8

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    Thank you so much, that is exactly what I was asking! you explained it GREAT...NO WRINKLES! :mrgreen: ....It will be awhile before I'm done I'm sure but once I finish I will post picture for you all to see!! THANKS AGAIN!

  9. #9
    Super Member mary quite contrary's Avatar
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    I'm anxious to see it done. Others gave you great advice. A walking foot really helps when machine quilting. It really saves on the frustration of shifting layers.

    Stitch in the ditch is following exactly down your seam lines. There is a foot that has a little blade that sticks straight down that makes it easy to ride right down that seam but (to my knowledge) doesn't come as a walking foot so it is a trade. You need to figure out what works best for you. As with anything it takes practice practice practice.

    Also, I use machingers but there are other things out there. They are a glove with rubber finger tips which helps grip the quilt as I am moving it around.

    Quiltinlee said pins every 2 inches. Don't skimp on this. That is what helps keep those nasty wrinkles away.

  10. #10
    Moderator Jim's Gem's Avatar
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    I like to use the basing spray, getting on the floor to pin a thousand pins is just murder. Spray between the backing and the batting and again between the batting and the top. I usually do half the quilt at a time. I am lucky that I usually have help in "sandwiching" my quilts, and because my DH is a pastor at the church we attend, which is basically across the street (ok maybe 300 yards away) we go over to the church and either lay it out on the floor there or gather several long tables together to lay on top of them. If I have decided to quilt diagonals across the quilt, which I do a lot, I bring a cheap masking tape and use it to tape across the quilt squares so I have a straight line to sew. I will tape the quilts and then roll them on the diagonal (so the middle tape line is in between the rolls) Just remove the tape lines before you quilt that exact spot, it's no fun to try and get the tape from under your stitching. Have fun!!!

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