Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 7 1 2 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62

Thread: Basting Guns ... what do you think?

  1. #1
    Junior Member GiddyUpGo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Rough and Ready, CA
    Posts
    142

    Basting Guns ... what do you think?

    After quilting my first quilt I had a lot of problems with tucks in the back, which I learned was due to me not taping down the backing when making the quilt sandwich. So this time I taped it down pretty tightly to my dining room table and basted it with safety pins, and I'm still getting tucks in the back. Dang.

    I think maybe I'm just not using enough safety pins, which is because I haaaate basting. So I thought maybe I'd look into basting guns but the one they have on JoAnn has really mixed reviews; most of the poor reviews have to do with its quality. At 50 bucks it's kind of a lot of money to spend on something that will break before the end of one quilt.

    So has anyone out there used a basting gun and had good results, and if so what brand do you use?

    OR maybe someone has a better idea ... I've never tried spray basting, maybe that would solve my problem? Do you need to combine spray basting with pinning?

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,561
    Blog Entries
    1
    I used to use a basting gun. There are different qualities. If you go this route, be sure to get one with a fine needle and small plastic thingies. I can check mine and post the brand if you need it (I think it's Avery fine needle).

    It is much easier to spray baste than to use a basting gun, though, plus I get better results with spray basting. I would encourage you to focus on spray basting. If you don't have access to a large table, it's pretty easy and inexpensive to purchase a couple of plastic sawhorses and a piece of plywood at a big box hardware store. This can be set up in the driveway and easily taken down and stored in a garage when not in use. I would also recommend buying 4 of the largest, best clamps at the hardware store (I paid about $5 each for 3-inch plastic clamps with an easy on-off trigger) to use with this setup. I also recommend paying a few bucks so you can use 505 instead of other brands of spray basters. 505 has never let me down. On a very large quilt I may place safety pins around the border to ensure the layers don't separate there; otherwise I don't bother.

    Another thing you can do to prevent tucks, no matter what basting method you use, is to heavily starch the backing fabric before layering. I use a 1:1 solution of Sta-Flo liquid laundry starch and water, "paint" this onto the yardage using a large wall painting brush until fabric is saturated, toss in dryer, then iron with steam. I also spray starch the top before layering. Starch stabilizes the fabrics so they are much less likely to stretch and distort while machine quilting.

  3. #3
    Power Poster Sadiemae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    11,365
    Blog Entries
    20
    My late DM had one and she threw it in the trash.
    Sadiemae

  4. #4
    Super Member quiltsRfun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    6,213
    Quote Originally Posted by Sadiemae View Post
    My late DM had one and she threw it in the trash.
    That's where mine ended up but because it fell apart. I found it difficult to use and didn't replace it. This was before I discovered spray basting. Boy has that simplified my life as far as quilting goes. Quicker and easier than safety pins and I don't get any tucks in the backing. Just finished quilting three tops and it went so smoothly with the spary basting. Nice and smooth, no tucks. Can't say that about the one that I used the basting gun.

  5. #5
    Super Member luvTooQuilt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    A Hop from Heaven, a Skip from Sanity and a Jump from the Good Life....
    Posts
    7,122
    Blog Entries
    1
    I have one.. I use it for taging garage sale price tags now..

  6. #6
    Junior Member GiddyUpGo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Rough and Ready, CA
    Posts
    142
    OK I am officially unsold. I'm buying some 505 at the craft store tomorrow!

  7. #7
    Super Member Crqltr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,775
    Blog Entries
    2
    I had one...used it quite a bit for awhile. It jambed up all the time and left holes in the cotton. I just pin now...a lot of pins.

  8. #8
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    13,768
    I have one, but use it for other reasons, never quilting.

    Spray Basting is the way to go ... and remember, you'll still need to tape down that backing down!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Sew many ideas ... just sew little time!!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  9. #9
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,027
    The first one I bought fell apart. The second one, an Avery brand with a fine needle and tags is a GEM! I've used it for many quilts and haven't even had to change the needle yet.

    I don't punch straight down and fire, though. I go into the top at an almost-level oblique angle, pick up the backing fabric and come back up and then fire, so that both ends of the tag are on the top of the quilt. I use a Kwik Klip tool to brace the needle tip and push the fabric as far onto the needle as it will go.

    It's my favorite method of basting. I will never use spray basting again. If there is any poly in your batting or fabric, the propellants can react with the poly and will remain sticky enough to gum up your needle. Gummed needles = skipped stitches. I had one vintage scrappy that I ended up throwing away because I could NOT stitch more than an inch before I needed to clean the needle. I have used 505, June Tailor, Sullivans and EmbTech sprays and since I didn't keep track of which ones have caused trouble, but ALL of them say not to use them on polyester, so they have probably all got the same problem. Lots of people use them and love them, but they've been frustrating enough for me that I'm willing to use ANY other method to baste than sprays.


    When I run low on the fine tags for the Avery gun, I will buy the MicroStitch brand - people who have tried both apparently find the MicroStitch even nicer to work with.

  10. #10
    Super Member QandE2010's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Florida - formerly Montana
    Posts
    3,085
    Yes, if you starch backing, iron wrinkles out, tape it down & LIGHTLY spray baste each layer with 505, and press each layer gently with your hands to be sure it lays flat, I think you'll be happy with the result. I too, have the gun & it makes holes in the fabric, so I don't use it for quilting. Good luck.
    Alma
    Nami to 6

Page 1 of 7 1 2 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.