Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Batik

  1. #21
    lin
    lin is offline
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,053
    I see nothing wrong with mixing machine and hand quilting. I think using the machine for the sitd would work for you Steve (and no, it's not hard) and you could have a little fun with patterns in the sashing and borders by hand. Whatever you decide, it's going to be great.

  2. #22
    Steve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    707
    Will give it a go then when I get to that point. Thanks for the words of encouragement. :-)

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    149
    When I machine stitch in the ditch I use the the open-toed sole plate on the even feed foot. I think it makes it easier to stay on the line.

    I also pretreat all batiks with Retayne to set the dyes.
    http://www.prochemical.com/directions/Retayne.htm[/url]

  4. #24
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,114
    Blog Entries
    1
    thanks for the tip on pretreating batiks, I would hate to have spent so much money on them to have them fade away.......

  5. #25
    Steve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    707
    I've been using vinegar thus far, isn't it OK to use as well?

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Central California
    Posts
    149
    I have never tried to set the dye with vinegar but when I first started sewing with batiks I used salt to set the dyes. I had to do it over and over again to get the rinse water to run clear. When I use Retayne I only have to treat the fabric once.

    Judy

  7. #27
    Steve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    707
    I hand wash the fabrics now to get the sizing out, then rinse and wash again in a vinegar water mix, rinse it again, put it though the salad spinner and then heat set in the dryer. I notice the dark and red colors are the most susceptible to bleeding, though have started the process with every bit of fabric. I note also that there is a heck of a lot less fraying when done by hand.

    Picked up a couple more yards this morning to practice the paper piecing with. I want to see how batik will hold up against regular cottons when done this way, though imagine there will be little problem on that score.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst ... 2 3

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.