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Thread: Batting question

  1. #1
    Senior Member lhavelka's Avatar
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    So I know that I am probably not the only one who has this problem. I buy queen size batting warm and natural and end up with excess. The quilt I am working on now is 66x80. The queen is 90x102. So after I cut out what I need, is there a way to put two pieces of batting together so that I dont waste all this batting? Do I sew it together or I thought of taking a piecing of fusing and ironing to together?

    Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Power Poster erstan947's Avatar
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    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join

  3. #3
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I butt the edges together and use a zig zag stitch to hold it together. I've heard of some people using some type of fusible to do it also.

  4. #4
    Super Member Jennifer22206's Avatar
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    I zig zag stitch mine. works wonderfully.

    Or I use my small pieces in my miniature quilts.

  5. #5
    Senior Member lhavelka's Avatar
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    I definitely thought about zig zagging it together but I didnt know if it would show a seam in the quilt.

  6. #6
    Super Member brushandthimble's Avatar
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    overlap two pieces and cut with rotary cutter in a smooth large wave and zig zag together by butting the pieces together not overlapping the edges. never shows through.
    THEN there is the fusiable joining, either with the new tape you can buy or I have cut thin strips of fusiable web and used that for wall hangings.

  7. #7
    RST
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    Senior Member RST's Avatar
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    I do the wide zig zag, and never have any trouble with it showing through. I also use smaller pieces for little projects like bags or hotpads. I store all my scraps and strips of batting rolled up in a big zippered floor-pillow case. It's an ok pillow on a daybed, it stays clean and relatively smooth, and it's easy to find when I need it.

    RST

  8. #8
    Power Poster sueisallaboutquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join
    Me too.

  9. #9
    mim
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    Quote Originally Posted by sueisallaboutquilts
    Quote Originally Posted by erstan947
    I butt the two edges together and zigzag to join
    Me too.
    sometimes, if it is a wall hanging, i will hand sew a tailors baste stitch. I like the idea of a wavy cut and zig zag with the largest stitch. I use mostly fiberfill because of allergies in people I give t that is easy to but and baste

    Mim in very cold tonite Maine

  10. #10
    Super Member Jan in VA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brushandthimble
    overlap two pieces and cut with rotary cutter in a smooth large wave and zig zag together by butting the pieces together not overlapping the edges. never shows through.
    THEN there is the fusiable joining, either with the new tape you can buy or I have cut thin strips of fusiable web and used that for wall hangings.
    You know, I've been quilting for decades and butting batting for much of that time, but it never occurred to me straighten the dang edge like you describe! An old wallpaperer's trick; can't believe I didn't apply it here, LOL! :mrgreen:

    Love this board!
    Jan in VA

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