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Thread: Beginners Applique Question

  1. #1
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    Beginners Applique Question

    I just picked up a beginners applique technique book and would like to know the best type of fusible web to use. I noticed there are some that have the fusible bonding agent on both sides, and others that just have it on one side. What would the applications be for each type. I'm a little confused. Thanks to anyone who can help me get my head around this!

  2. #2
    Super Member Treasureit's Avatar
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    You want it to have bonding on both sides....you will trace the design on the paper the cut out around the design (NOT on the lines yet) then iron to the BACK SIDE of the fabric and then cut out the design. Now when you place the applique on the other fabric you can iron it in place.

  3. #3
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    Fusible Applique: I like Wonderunder for my fusible and some people like Misty fuse for a softer appliqué. You can use Heat and Bond lite to sew through but don't get regular Heat and Bond. Regular Heat and Bond is meant to stick without sewing and the sewing machine doesn't like it. Most sewing fusibles come with a paper side (where you draw your reverse shape on) and a rough side that goes to the wrong side of fabric. You use an iron to fuse it and when it cools, you remove the paper and it is ready to fuse to the background fabric. I like to use a buttonhole to secure the edge.
    The only fusible that fuses on one side only, would be the product that gets fused to fabric for purses? I can't think of any others, maybe someone else can help you with that one.


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    Thanks everyone!

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    There is a method where you use the interfacing for appliqué.

    You trace the appliqué shape on the smooth side of the interfacing. Then put the interfacing bumpy side to the right side of the appliqué fabric and sew along the traced shape. Cut a small slit in the interfacing and turn the little 'pillow' right side out. You can then place the appliqué where you want it on the background fabric, give it a fuse and then stitch it down using your chosen method. This way you have finished turned under edges, like with needle turn, without the exacting labor.

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    Oh, okay. I like that method, especially for something that will get washed. I always worry a little bit about raw edge applique fraying a little bit. Then would I use the one sided fusible interfacing with this method?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgras141621 View Post
    Oh, okay. I like that method, especially for something that will get washed. I always worry a little bit about raw edge applique fraying a little bit. Then would I use the one sided fusible interfacing with this method?
    Yes. I recently used this method for the first time. I had to appliqué 25 5" hearts on a quilt. It worked really well. Good points and smooth curves. I liked it because there was no stiffness from the fusible and since it wasn't fused down flat it more closely resembled needle turn appliqué.

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    Thanks so much! I'm going to give that a try.

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    Super Member kathdavis's Avatar
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    Remember when you trace the pattern on the smooth side of the iron on interfacing, you must reverse the pattern, so it comes out right when you iron it on the fabric on the wrong side.
    Kathleen

    Remember, people will see your quilts long after you are gone....NOT your housework!

  10. #10
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Just be aware that the fusible interfacing method (sew, then turn) works best with larger appliques. It doesn't work well for small applique pieces or for pieces that have a lot of detail.

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