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Thread: Best Beginner Rotary Cutter

  1. #1
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I am offically taking the plunge and starting a topper for my piano. I realize I could do it without buy a rotary cutter, but I figure if I buy one I will be forced to use it again.

    What do you think I should buy? I don't want to start off at the top of the line, but I don't want something that will be unpleasant to work with.

    Any suggestions and tips will be appreciated.

    Lisa

  2. #2
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    Gosh -- I've never thought about the quality of my rotary cutter!! I bought mine in a set --- rotary cutter, mat, and ruler -- at Joanne's a few years ago for $20.00. It's cut MANY MANY yards of fabric. I've sharpened and replaced the blades....but they're so standard, I don't think there's any "good, better, or best". I'd say get the cheaper one and then if you want a new toy, go for the more expensive ones.

  3. #3
    Super Member sewjoyce's Avatar
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    I have a standard Olfa which works just grand...but don't forget the cutting mat and ruler :wink:

  4. #4
    a regular here cutebuns's Avatar
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    Most rotary cutters are very similar, find out of they will let you at least hold it out of the packaging and see if it is comfortable in your hand, Some are easier to bare the blade than others, you soon get used to the one that you are working with. since you should always put the guard on the blade when you lay it down, make sure it is easy for you to do.

  5. #5
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I'm glad to hear I won't have to spend too much. I have seen sets that include a mat which has a flip side for ironing. That might be a nice space saver for small projects.

    Lisa

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    Power Poster Lacelady's Avatar
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    I have three different makes, but the one I use all the time is the Olfa that shuts (or goes into safety mode) when you put it down. This is the safest one for me, because I am inclined to forget to put the safety catch on with the others. With my Olfa, I know it is safe the minute it is out of my hand, because the blade is only in operation when I am squeezing the handle. (You can also lock it in the safety position, if you have children around) Worth any extra money to me, compared to cheaper alternatives.

  7. #7
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    Which ever one you start with will be the one you will feel comfortable using and uncomfortable using a different one. I like Olfa or Fiskars curved handled ones I take to classes. The best one I use at home is Gingher with the Gingher blades.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacelady
    I have three different makes, but the one I use all the time is the Olfa that shuts (or goes into safety mode) when you put it down. This is the safest one for me, because I am inclined to forget to put the safety catch on with the others. With my Olfa, I know it is safe the minute it is out of my hand, because the blade is only in operation when I am squeezing the handle. (You can also lock it in the safety position, if you have children around) Worth any extra money to me, compared to cheaper alternatives.
    This Olfa Ergonomic one (45 mm) is the one I recommend to all my student. I am still cutting with the same Olfa that I bought 20 years ago! (I have changed the blade, of course. :lol: )

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacelady
    I have three different makes, but the one I use all the time is the Olfa that shuts (or goes into safety mode) when you put it down. This is the safest one for me, because I am inclined to forget to put the safety catch on with the others. With my Olfa, I know it is safe the minute it is out of my hand, because the blade is only in operation when I am squeezing the handle. (You can also lock it in the safety position, if you have children around) Worth any extra money to me, compared to cheaper alternatives.
    I, too, tend to forget to shield the blade when I set the cutter down. Blood is so annoying to get out of fabric. And those cuts bleed for quite a while!

    I think if I was to get only one now - it would be a 45 mm with an automatic blade shield when it's not in use. I don't know if brand is that all-important any more. Like someone said, the first one you adapt to, will be the one you will probably like best.

    I think one is better off getting good quality tools the first time one buys them (by good, I do not necessarily mean the very top of the line). I think it saves a lot of money in the long run.

  10. #10
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    OK -- addendum to the question. If the brand isn't overly important, is the size? Is one cutting mat better?

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