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Thread: Best Way to Applique and Why?

  1. #11
    Super Member patchsamkim's Avatar
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    There are so many ways to applique...first you will want to decide if you want to applique by machine or by hand. You can find methods for both that have visible stitches or not. Machine applique had many variables, and a lot may be determined by the sewing machine that you have. When I bought my machine 20 years ago, I knew I wanted a machine that does the blanket stitch, and I do most of my applique with that. It is a fusible applique, but I use the fusible just around the outer 1/4" edge, the center stays soft that way, not stiff from the fusible. I also like doing the "mock-hand applique" which I do using freezer paper, and a very narrow blind hem stitch with invisible thread. Satin stitch if done well looks great, but it takes more time, more thread, and you really need to use a stabilizer for it to look good.
    Maybe make some samples of different kinds of applique and see which you prefer.

  2. #12
    Super Member LivelyLady's Avatar
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    I think it's different strokes for different folks. I tried every hand applique technique and found that needle turn was for me. I don't have to do extra steps as required by other techniques so it's a great carry along project. I also tried the different machine appliques and my preference by far is raw edge with buttonhole or decorative stitching. I would try out the different techniques and you'll find the ones that are just right for you.
    When you sleep under a quilt, you sleep under a blanket of love.

  3. #13
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    I like the freezer paper method, no raw edgeds to unravel!!

  4. #14
    Super Member earthwalker's Avatar
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    I have done both...and as the others have mentioned, depends on the look you are seeking and the project. I still go back to what I learned first.... edges turned under and small invisible (well as invisible as possible) stitching. I use a card template and iron the edges under rather than needleturn. I have done the raw edge with zigzagging using my machine....wasn't sure how it would work out with washing etc. I did some on a pot mitt as a test, and so far it's still looking good.

  5. #15
    Super Member Becky Crafts's Avatar
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    I haven't heard of any right or wrong way to applique. For me, I like to sew 2 pcs together face to face all around, then snip the back to turn the piece & stitch close to the edge to sew it on my project. Like the others have told you, it's personal preference & the look you're going for. My quilts get washed a lot so my way has to stand up well for that purpose. Good luck, hope we get to see your project!
    Live Simply, Love Generously, Care Deeply,Speak Kindly, Leave the rest to GOD

  6. #16
    Super Member Rose Marie's Avatar
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    As a beginner I like the method I saw El Burns do. She sewed fusible web to the fabric, dont iron. Cut out shape then make a slit in fusible and turn to right side, this way no raw edges. Then you iron onto fabric and sew edges.
    Of course this is for simple shapes for beginners.

  7. #17
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    Just want to mention about the Eleanor Burns technique -- sewing a fusible to the piece, making a slit in the fusible, then turning inside out -- that it does not work well for small pieces and pieces with a lot of detail. This method works best for larger shapes with fairly smooth curves, such as medium or larger flowers, or large flower petals. I tried this method on a typical size Sunbonnet Sue block and found it didn't work well for small pieces.

  8. #18
    Super Member mary quilting's Avatar
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    Freezer paper applique is my favorite also I like the clean look of it

  9. #19
    Senior Member Jeanette Frantz's Avatar
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    I have done some Sunbonnet Sue applique -- a 45X60 crib quilt. The Sunbonnet Sue patterns available are fabulous -- a LOT of work, but fabulous. I recently appliqued some large lettering for a quilt-top (baby), but the stabilizer I used just didn't agree with my sewing machine. I messed up so many times I wore a hole in the quilt top. SO, then I had to go to the "commercially-made" appliques to cover up the hole. No one but me will ever know where the hole is/was, though, so that's cool. By using the fusible and then the buttonhole stitck along the edges (using invisible thread), I was able to turn out a block that was really special.

    I think it's a matter of your own preference, and being a rank amateur, I'm still learning!

    Jeanette Frantz

  10. #20
    Super Member #1piecemaker's Avatar
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    I have done a few different methods. I think it depends on the project as to which method to use.
    Be the best that you can be at everything you do.

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