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Thread: Best way to press a big quilt top

  1. #1
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
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    Best way to press a big quilt top

    What is the best way to press a big heavy quilt top (Queen - King size)?
    Do you do it on a standard ironing board, standing up, use another table to prop the other part that you are not working on? Or with the board on the floor?

  2. #2
    MTS
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    Quote Originally Posted by liont View Post
    Or with the board on the floor?
    Ouch. I'm in pain just thinking about that.

    In my dream studio, I'd have 4'x8' ironing board surface.

    But since I don't, an ironing board (with me most definitely STANDING) and a folding table to hold some of the bulk/weight of the quilt top if needed (meaning I wasn't too lazy to set it up).

    I usually try to make sure that the sections are well pressed (I'm a starch junkie) so that when sewn together, it's only THAT seam that needs to be worked on.

    I also like to work in quadrants rather than long rows.
    Much easier to handle.

    Just personal preference.
    Last edited by MTS; 09-07-2012 at 07:50 AM.

  3. #3
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    Ditto. I press my rows, then my sections and then it just leaves the last few seams to press when assembled. If it has been folded away and I need to press the whole top, I put on my knee pads and press it on the old carpet on the cement basement floor. Yep, that is my last resort and I only do it when really desperate.

  4. #4
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    My response is similar to MTS - except I'm generally NOT a fan of starch/sizing.

    If/when each section is pressed, and one takes care not to rumple the section(s), the only serious pressing required is for those last seams. It's also easier to find and fix a glitch if one catches one when the sections are smaller.

    On the floor? I can barely get MYSELF down to and up from the floor - but the visual is pretty interesting - - -

    I think my carpet would melt - I dropped the iron once, and there is a melted spot there.

  5. #5
    Super Member Neesie's Avatar
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    YIKES! I've only done up to a twin size but what works for me, is to lay out the quilt on my cutting table, then slip an ironing pad underneath. You have keep moving the pad from spot to spot, but it gets the job done. I do this, when I glue baste, to set the glue. If you don't have an ironing pad/ironing mat, do a Google search on them. They're fairly easy to find and come in different sizes.
    Neesie


    By all means let's be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.
    ~Richard Dawkins

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by liont View Post
    What is the best way to press a big heavy quilt top (Queen - King size)?
    . . .
    With an iron -

    Seriously, if you have room for a 'big board' - a large rectangular surface instead of the angled standard ironing board - it makes pressing/ironing large items and yardage ever so much easier.

  7. #7
    Senior Member liont's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the ideas. Using a table to prop up the bulk is doable.
    I was thinking of laying layers of fabric on the floor - that becomes a big big ironing board

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