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Thread: Bindings - is there an advantage to bias?

  1. #1
    Super Member beatys9's Avatar
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    Bindings - is there an advantage to bias?

    I've always cut my bindings on the fabric bias. It's certainly easier to go around corners but I yesterday I was at the quilting store (spending my $50 birthday gift card from my son!) and the woman that cut my fabric told me it was just as well to cut my bindings with the nap if I'm not dealing with curves. This might be nice as I'd prefer not to cut into the middle of my fabric but wonder are there other considerations? I learned to do bindings on the bias and now am curious what others do and what are the pros & cons?
    Shannon

  2. #2
    Super Member quilter1's Avatar
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    I cut my bindings on the straight grain unless there is a curved edge to deal with. It saves fabric and works just fine for me. Maybe the quilt police will be after me now.

  3. #3
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    I only use bias binding on curves now. I like straight of grain double fold binding better for a straighter edge on my quilt. They used to say that bias wears better on the quilt edge. I figure I would rather do the easier binding and if I am around to replace it in 50 years, I will.

  4. #4
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    i cut on the width of the fabric unless using a directional print that goes the length of the fabric.
    When using directional print, it is best to cut with the design and not try to cut with grain. In these cases the print on the binding becomes part of the overall look of the quilt. Bias only if curves or if I want a stripe that looks better on the diagonal.

  5. #5
    Super Member burchquilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quilter1 View Post
    I cut my bindings on the straight grain unless there is a curved edge to deal with. It saves fabric and works just fine for me. Maybe the quilt police will be after me now.
    Well, if they bust you then I'm next because I only use straight of grain. Bias just seems like waaaaaay too much work & by the time I get that far in my quilting project, I'm ready to finish up & be on to the next one.
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  6. #6
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    I like bias binding because I think it hugs the edge of the quilt better.

    Maybe one of these days I'll make a pot holder and bind two sides of it with straight binding and the other two sides with bias binding to 'test' how the bindings wear. (Using the same fabric for both, of course.)

  7. #7
    Senior Member IAmCatOwned's Avatar
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    Over time, bias will nearly always win out over straight grain. I've had my own proof of that. I've been making blankets and quilts since the early 90s and those with straight grain and a lot of use have had to have bindings replaced. The bias ones are still going well.

    Contrary to the woman at the quilt shop, continuous binding actually uses LESS fabric than straight grain binding. In addition, you don't have to sew all those little strips together - two big strips, then cut, cut, cut. I don't even press it any longer, having learned that it actually goes on better if you DON'T prepress it in half. I must have the instructions in front of me each time I do it since I only make a few bindings a year.

    If you are not entering the quilt into a show, use whatever method you prefer. Most show judges will take off for straight grain binding on a bed sized quilt - I don't think they care one way or the other on a wall hanging or miniature. I use straight grain for all my wall hangings and miniatures unless I'm using up leftover bias from other projects. They aren't washed as frequently, so it's not a big deal.

    Another reason to use bias is if you are using a striped fabric for the binding. Visually, the angled stripes look much better than straight grain.

    Finally, NOBODY is going to beat you up if you choose to use straight grain.
    Last edited by IAmCatOwned; 08-06-2012 at 09:41 AM.
    Current piecing: Zig Zag quilt & LOTL (HSTs done, assembling units)
    Hand piecing project: Apple core (TOP IS DONE!!!! Yay!)

  8. #8
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    I only use straight of grain also, unless I am doing curvers, like a round potholder or curved placemat. Of course in the long run you will use less. If you deceide to change remember there will be a learning curve because you are used to the give of the bias, and it will not be there for the straight of grain.....
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  9. #9
    Senior Member RonieM's Avatar
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    I only use bias bindings if I am binding a curve, otherwise I go with straight of grain. I have been doing it this way for 15 years and haven't had a problem yet.

  10. #10
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    I only use bias, because it lasts longer. I don't use the tube method, but cut each strip separately and join them it on the diagonal. If you think about it, a straight of grain binding has one single thread exposed at the outside edge where the quilt will get wear, while a bias binding has a hundred threads at the outside edge. Also, I love the way a striped fabric looks when cut on the bias.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

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