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Thread: bisquit/puff quilt

  1. #1
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    Has anyone made a bisquit or puff quilt?? Do you have any directions? I have looked at directions on line and they didn't explain it very well. Are they quick to make? Can I use very super thin batting instead of poly fill? I need quits fast and since I hand quilt which takes so long to do I thought these would be perfect. they look so warm and cozy. thanks for the help

  2. #2
    Power Poster Prism99's Avatar
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    I haven't made one but fell in one love with a pictue and story of one in a book years ago. It was handmade out of silk scraps by a boy who got sick and was confined to bed for a year. The silk scraps were leftovers from dresses made for his female family members, I think. Someone cut the pieces for him, and he hand sewed the squares and filled them.

    My understanding is that they are fairly simple to make. The top layer is cut larger than the bottom layer, and the excess on each side is made into a tuck. The one I loved had a centered tuck, with the excess folded over on each side of the tuck. The tuck itself was on the outside of the edge (ballooning out, rather than being tucked in). I have since seen pictures in which the tucks were taken differently -- sometimes just one fold in the center of an edge, with each fold facing in the same direction (so, for example, they all folded in the same direction going clockwise).

    I don't think super thin batting would work for stuffing. Polyfill is very fluffy so it "puffs" the puff out. Thin batting would not fill in the puff. You could probably use old-fashioned cotton batting (100% cotton Blue Ribbon batting from Mountain Mist, for example) as long as you pull it apart and fluff it up as you go. Silk batting would be lovely too, I think, but it's more expensive; advantage would be it is very light in weight and warm, but breathes.

    Once you have the top made, there is no batting. You just add a backing fabric and tack top to backing at regular intervals between the puffs.

    If you are looking for warm and cozy, I would not make the puffs too puffy as I think that would add stiffness. Silk would be luxurious for the top, but then you would probably want flannel for the backing so it stays n place.

    I honestly don't think these quilts are any faster to construct than traditional quilts (if the traditional quilts are tacked), but I still love the look of them.

  3. #3
    Moderator Up North's Avatar
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    I remember a lady making them using the legs from nylon stockings for the poof part.

  4. #4
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    I like the puff quilt to look at, and I once tried making one, many moons ago, never completed it, but on the other hand, that was before I was quilting also. I think I'll just stick to regular quilts, but if you want to try it, go for it.

  5. #5
    Super Member amandasgramma's Avatar
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    I've made one! They're fun. If I remember right, you cut the top square 1/2" bigger than the bottom. (5" bottom square, 5 1/2" top square". The top would be the "good" fabric, the bottom is okay to use cheap muslim. You do a pleat in the middle of three sides, and sew the squares, wrong sides together, leaving open the 4th side. I did all 140 or so squares and tossed them in a sack. At night, while watching tv, I'd fill those squares with polyester fiberfill (like what you use for stuffing toys). Then sew up the 5th side. Sew the blocks together so the seam is to the back. Then I sewed it to a backing (no batting). I then tied the front blocks to the backing.

  6. #6
    MNQuilter's Avatar
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    http://www.quilterscache.com/P/PuffQuiltingBlock.html

    I didn't know what a puff quilt was and when I googled it, the first entry was from Quilters Cache. Good luck and post pictures if you do it. It looksl ike it would be really cozy in flannel!

  7. #7
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
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    http://sewsisters.blogspot.com/2009/...is-new_19.html

    Clover has a great new tool to make puff quilt blocks.

  8. #8
    Super Member SharonC's Avatar
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    Well....the next new grandbaby is definitely getting one of these :) :).

  9. #9
    Moderator kathy's Avatar
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    I made one, they are NOT fast and get to be a real job sewing together as it gets bigger because it just keeps getting heavier.

  10. #10
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    I had never heard of this before this thread, but I like them! It seems like it would be a good use for charm packs. On quilterscache, they talk about pillow quilts where both squares are the same size. With charm packs you could make a reversible quilt.

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