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Thread: A Border Challenge.....Need Help Please?

  1. #1
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    A Border Challenge.....Need Help Please?

    I am preparing to quilt a 'vintage' quilt....not sure how old it is but probably about 50 years. It is a star pattern that is pieced similar to a Grandmother's Flower Garden. I added a border by measuring the center of the quilt first. I then added another smaller border the same way. Now, when I put the quilt into the LA machine, I realize there is a LOT of the first-placed border, and it is gathering up in a major way. I did a re-measure and it all computes number-wise, but the edges of the quilt s-t-r-e-t-c-h, obviously cut on the bias. So, what do I do now??? I don't mind ripping out and re-sewing, but the measurements are correct; how do I control the stretch? Bewildered.......and appreciate any suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Linda

  2. #2
    Senior Member suzanprincess's Avatar
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    Starch can be your friend...

    If you stiffen the fabric it will help control the stretch; starch it, or apply school glue (washable), press when dry. You could then staystitch it if more control is needed--just sew a line of stitching about 1/8" from the edge (so it's invisible after seaming).

    To get the stretched fabric back to shape wet it, let dry, then press, making sure not to stretch those bias areas. Be sure to take a before and after picture for later evidence of your efforts!

  3. #3
    Junior Member rainbow quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by suzanprincess View Post
    If you stiffen the fabric it will help control the stretch; starch it, or apply school glue (washable), press when dry. You could then staystitch it if more control is needed--just sew a line of stitching about 1/8" from the edge (so it's invisible after seaming).

    To get the stretched fabric back to shape wet it, let dry, then press, making sure not to stretch those bias areas. Be sure to take a before and after picture for later evidence of your efforts!


    My vote is for stay stitching. This is something that I learned long ago when garment sewing and use it in quilting when I have a bias edge on the outside. You're starting with a vintage quilt, but when I'm making a new quilt, I do this as I construct a block so that it never gets the chance to stretch out of shape.

  4. #4
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
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    I've never used this with something big - just small triangles but what about a sewing stabilizer? I use a washable stabilizer that people use for embroidery. I stitch the piece and then pull off the stabilizer.

    Again I've NEVER tried this with a big thing. Maybe this idea will spark other ideas from other people.

    I hope you give us pictures!!!!
    Carrie, Queen of the Seam Rippers!

  5. #5
    Senior Member CarrieC's Avatar
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    On another current thread (in the MAIN section of the board - I believe the name of the posting is FABRIC GLUE) someone spoke iof using Elmer's school glue! No really! I almost flipped. Not only will I be trying this but - would it work to help you??????
    Carrie, Queen of the Seam Rippers!

  6. #6
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    Bias edges, don't you just hate them? If the borders are the right measurement and it's the quilt itself that is stretching, I'm puzzled along with you. You could take it off the frame, lay it out on a clean sheet and spritz it with water and block it into approx square and let it dry. I think though that when you reload it it will just stretch again? All I can think of is doing the best you can to square it as you sew and quilt the heck out of it. If the border is wide enough you could maybe trim some of it to square it up when it's done. Maybe someone else can give you some more ideas. Good luck!

  7. #7
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    Good advice from all.......I also took the project to my Quilting Guild. They were also perplexed. The border is cut on the straight grain, so the problem is definitely caused from the bias edges of the quilt itself. So, I'm currently ripping out the top border to re-measure and use a spray on it to see if it will be more controllable. I will report back. Thanks again for your help.
    Linda

  8. #8
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    OK...I ripped out the old top and bottom borders, remeasured (at the center as I've been instructed to do in all my previous endeavors), and re-attached new borders.....without mitering. Still dealing with a rippled effect as you can see from photos. I am NOT doing another do-over; so I carefully gathered up the ripples and pinned a fake seam ever so often. My plan is to quilt over the "seams". I haven't decided whether to hand-stitch the opening down before or after quilting. This baby is not coming off the rollers again, so sleeping on that decision tonight. D-a-r-n, d-a-r-n, d-a-r-n those bias seams!
    Linda

  9. #9
    Senior Member leggz48's Avatar
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    oooops.......here are pics.
    Attached Images Attached Images Click to view large image  Click to view large image 
    Linda

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