Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Border question - a little confused.

  1. #11
    bearpaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,635
    All right, I tried ripping some scraps that I had and I didn't do very well. :( I was too scared to try it on the border fabric, so I folded cut end to cut end, lined up the selvages (like sspingler suggested) and cut away. The border strips turned out ok, they may be a little crooked, but not bad. I can live with it.

    Thanks everyone for your advice, I think I'll try ripping again with fabric that isn't so expensive. :wink: Then maybe I'll be more comfortable with it.

  2. #12
    Super Member Butterflyspain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Torrox, Andalucia, Southern Spain
    Posts
    9,534
    B.zang´s idea was a good one to help you get started, about pulling a thread. I have to say I rip and have ripped always. Wouldn´t rip with raw silk and would probably use the folded method. Glad you got it sorted. Try practicing and do it as fast as you can. Iron it after ripping and you will find it will do just great.

    Elle

  3. #13
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    northern New England
    Posts
    460
    And only rip the lengthwise grain, not the crosswise.

  4. #14
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    15,486
    The pulled thread method has worked for me. Tedious, but it works.

    I'll tear the fabric for the backing with no hesitation.

    Something I learned/observed from a Quilter's Newletter cover.

    Some fabrics that appear to be all-over prints actually have "stripes" in them. This quilt on that cover had three sides that had the same "band/strip" of fabric and the fourth side was different and appeared "off"

    So - if the border fabric has a design, kind of watch for that.

    Did this make sense?

    Way back when the dinosaurs walked the earth, we were told to straighten fabric if it was off-grain. I've now decided that after machine washing and drying the fabric, to let it do what it wants to.

    I much prefer to cut my strips on the lengthwise grain. At least I have a straight grain going in one direction.

    Doreen Speckman cuts her sashings on the crosswise grain - she says it gives one wiggle room if one has to ease a block in. She's right about that.

  5. #15
    Super Member Moonpi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,852
    I just wanted to say that for long border pieces, I always use a walking foot - makes them come out much more even.

  6. #16
    Super Member retrogirl02's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    IN
    Posts
    1,745
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterflyspain
    Try practicing and do it as fast as you can.
    Elle
    LOL. Yeah, like a bandage covering an owie you know will be painful to remove....THAT fast.

    It still makes me queasy each time I do it, but it does come out straight when you're using 100% cotton.

  7. #17
    Moderator tlrnhi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    In the middle of a mess...
    Posts
    19,850
    I too am scared to do the ripping thing. I will use the cutter. I just take my time at it.

  8. #18
    bearpaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,635
    Quote Originally Posted by Moonpi
    I just wanted to say that for long border pieces, I always use a walking foot - makes them come out much more even.
    That's a great idea. I've never thought of that.

  9. #19
    Power Poster
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    15,486
    I also measured and marked the borders before attaching them - I either used straight pins or a chalk pencil.

    If I was attaching this to 12 inch blocks, I would mark the border at 12 inch intervals, etc.

    When I just sewed a border on, it tended to come out unevenly.

    I have learned so much the hard way. So now I spend a few extra minutes in preparation and save myself hours of unsewing and resewing.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.