Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Borders -- how do you handle them?

  1. #1
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,790

    Borders -- how do you handle them?

    I was just thinking about borders as I was trying to figure out the size for a quilt -- here are some questions:

    -- Do you measure down the center to get the length of the border or do you just lay a piece of fabric down and sew on the border, cutting it afterward?

    -- Do you ever fudge the width of the border a bit to get the quilt the size you want?

    -- When you piece the border (with stars, flying geese or ...), do you adjust the size of the blocks or do you put in a "fudge factor" of a plain strip somewhere in the strip so everything comes out even?

    -- When you do mitered corners -- do you stitch all your borders together so you only have to do the miter once or do you miter each individually?

    -- Have you every used left over strips of random widths in a piano-key-like border and did you like the affect?

    -- Do you use cornerstones, miters or just lap your corners?

    -- Have you added prarie points -- and how do you handle the bulk?

    I'm interested to hear your thoughts on borders.
    Thanks.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  2. #2
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    8,879
    YES...

    to most of your questions---

    1. yes i measure through the center- cut the border and add it----
    yes, i have added borders to the sides then trimmed them to size
    2.yes- when necessary i 'adjust' the size of a border to fit the bed
    3.yes- when piecing borders i adjust the blocks to fit-
    yes- sometimes i have to add (fudge) to make a border work
    4. yes- when mitering multiple borders i stitch them together then do the miter- if that works for that project- if not- i add/miter individually
    5.yes- i've made varying size strips in a piano key border---yes i liked it
    6. yes- i use corner blocks if the quilt calls for it- yes i miter corners if the quilt needs that type of border- and yes i overlap borders on some quilts
    7.yes- i've used prarie points --- you trim the bulk

    so see- each quilt is an individual- each needs/has it's own needs- there are no wrong answers= you can make your quilt any way you want to achieve the outcome you are seeking.
    hiding away in my stash where i'm warm, safe and happy

  3. #3
    Super Member thepolyparrot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Mars
    Posts
    2,027
    Quote Originally Posted by QuiltnLady1 View Post
    -- Do you measure down the center to get the length of the border or do you just lay a piece of fabric down and sew on the border, cutting it afterward?
    I measure down the center to get the length for the side borders and sew those on, easing where necessary to make the quilt and border match in length. Then after pressing, I measure across the center of the quilt to get the length of the top and bottom borders and repeat the process.

    -- Do you ever fudge the width of the border a bit to get the quilt the size you want?
    You can make borders any size you want. Especially when you're working with pieced and whole borders, you often have an "odd" sized plain/whole border to accommodate the pieced one.

    -- When you piece the border (with stars, flying geese or ...), do you adjust the size of the blocks or do you put in a "fudge factor" of a plain strip somewhere in the strip so everything comes out even?
    If the difference is very small, you can simply ease the longer of two parts onto the shorter so that they come out the same size. An inch is easily eased in the large king-sized bed quilts that I usually make. I haven't done a lot of pieced borders, but the quilt I just finished has a narrow 3/4" plain border, a 1" sawtooth border, then a 6" border with contrasting corner blocks. If something hadn't fit, I could have adjusted with a strip of plain cloth, or I could have adjusted the 3/4" border to 1/2" or 1". This "floating" strip is adjusted a lot more when one of the subsequent borders will be made of larger blocks.

    -- When you do mitered corners -- do you stitch all your borders together so you only have to do the miter once or do you miter each individually?
    The next quilt that I'll finish will have mitered borders and I plan to sew all the strips into border units, sew them to the quilt and then miter the corners.

    -- Have you every used left over strips of random widths in a piano-key-like border and did you like the affect?
    Yes, I like this effect very much.

    I also like cornerstones, corner blocks, mitered corners, lapped corners - whatever looks nice. I've not used prairie points - yet - but I love the look of them.

    Here is a quilt I did with the piano key border:
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #4
    Super Member AnnieH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    North Essex, England
    Posts
    1,108
    thepolyparrot, your quilt is just brilliant. Wow.
    Annie

  5. #5
    Super Member QuiltnLady1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,790
    thepolyparrot -- I love your quilt!!

    Thank you for your responses. I was trying to find out how folks approach their borders. I normally measure through the middle of the quilt before I cut the borders, but sometimes on small quilts I don't bother (slap my hands). There are so many options, with borders that I wanted to see how folks approached them.
    QuiltnLady1

    When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.

  6. #6
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York City/Manhattan
    Posts
    1,274
    polyparrot. I love your quilt and pillowcases. they are gorgeous.

  7. #7
    QM
    QM is offline
    Super Member QM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Northern California mountains
    Posts
    6,294
    First, I make sure the quilt is pressed and opposite sides are equal. If not, I fix them. For straight borders, I am lazy about sewing then cutting. This works because of the first step and my very even pressure in combining the parts. I use both methods for miters, "depending". For pieced borders, if I need a fudge factor, it's generally in inner border strip, although sometimes I design something to put into the middle of the border to serve that purpose, generally also reversing the direction of the border in its middle. (Flying geese flying towards each other, for example). I use just about eery form of corner, but I think I use cornerstones more often than not.

  8. #8
    Senior Member MdmSew'n'Sew's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    a small village about 65 miles north of NYC
    Posts
    555
    Quote Originally Posted by thepolyparrot View Post
    Here is a quilt I did with the piano key border:


    Oh, my that lovely masterpiece can come and play at my house anytime! And bring the pillow covers too, so they don't get lonely!
    He who cuts his own wood is warmed twice, but she who makes her own quilt is warmed forever - SLR 11/7/2011

  9. #9
    Senior Member PolkaBabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Iowa City, IA.
    Posts
    985
    Ooooooo that is Wow! Love the way the colors go together.

  10. #10
    Senior Member GingerK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    785
    OMG thepolyparrot--that is an absolutely fabulous sunny take away the winter time blues quilt. It could come to my house and make me happy any November at all!!! Lovely!!

    Okay, back to the origional post. I have a need to keep my measurements right. I measure thru the center of my top, then cut the border and mark the block increments. I have found that it is easier to ease fullness and also helps to square up the blocks. Takes a bit more time and more math but it really really helps--especially if you have done the same for the sashing. I hate wonky tops.
    Never argue with an idiot. They'll drag you down the their level and beat you with experience.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.