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Thread: Broken Stove pattern

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Riverside County, Southern California
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    Has anyone heard of the Broken Stove quilt pattern?

    In the early 1960s my mother-in-law, raised in Tennessee, told me about it but couldn't remember exactly how it was pieced.

    I've been directed to the Broken Stone pattern, but I'm looking for Broken Stove. It's been a while since I ran a search on the Internet, so I'll try it again. Still, someone besides my m-i-l must know about this pattern.

    :?:

  2. #2

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    Jan 2007
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    Did a search using different engines and nothing showed up except a Drunkard's Path set in Robbing Peter to Pay Paul. My mother in law said the Broken Stove is an intricate design with the stovepipe wandering through the blocks.

    One of the searches was made at
    http://www.quiltstudy.org/search/index.html
    Where over 1800 quilts are cataloged, with pictures. The response to my search for Broken Stove:

    Primary Pattern: Broken Stove Eye
    Alternate Pattern: Rob Peter to Pay Paul
    Brackman #: 1450
    Quiltmaker: Maxtion, Mary
    Geographical Origin: Made in Boligee, Greene County, Alabama, USA
    Date: Circa 1980-1995
    Style/Type: African-American
    Dimensions (LxW): 92 x 72 Inches, 234 x 183 Centimeters
    Primary Technique: Pieced, Machine
    Other Techniques: Pieced, Hand
    Primary Fiber: Cotton Blend
    Primary Fabric: Broadcloth/Muslin
    Quilt Stitches/Inch: 4-5
    Binding: Back folded over
    Inscription Type: None
    Exhibitions: Wild By Design
    IQSC Collection: Robert and Helen Cargo Collection
    IQSC Object Number: 2000.004.0088

    Ah, well. Maybe I should make my own Broken Stove pattern.

  3. #3
    Super Member mimisharon's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    I've not heard of that particular one, but I lived with the pot belly stove in my childhood. They all look alike, if you like to design I bet you could come up with your own and make it work well.

    Sharon

  4. #4

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    Jan 2007
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    Riverside County, Southern California
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    Hey, thanks for the encouragement, Sharon.

    I, too, have put in some time with a wood-burner, so first-hand experience can serve me well. Keeping things more simple than my mother in law indicated is a must--my hubby calls me a slash-and-burn quilter.
    :P

  5. #5

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    Jan 2007
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    Never heard of a broken stove pattern. Sorry. can any body help me find a old necktie pattern?

  6. #6
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    a pattern for blocks shaped like neckties? or a patter for using up old neckties?

  7. #7

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    Jan 2007
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    Using old ties.

  8. #8
    community benefactor Knot Sew's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    I mlooked and the only thing I found is open them up and make them into a crazy quilt, or use the dresden plate pattern or grandmas fan. type it into google and have a go.......... :-o

  9. #9
    Norah's Avatar
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    Judy Lee, I am still looking for that pattern. I have several OLD quild pattern books that I am unable to locate for now. Hoping it is in one of them.

  10. #10
    Community Manager PatriceJ's Avatar
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    [quote]

    you can use neckties in quilts the same way you would any other fabric. there aren't any specific patterns that i know of. you'll want patterns that call for fairly small patches. patterns intended for using up fabric scraps are ideal. depending on how sturdy the tie fabric is, you might need to fuse it to another fabric or innerfacing for stability. using an overcast stitch along the edges would be a good idea to prevent fraying if you plan to wash the quilt.

    you could also sew the ties together to make bigger pieces of fabric that you could then cut into patches. or for strip/string pieced quilts.

    here's a web site i love to check when i want "scrappy" inspiration

    http://www.quiltville.com/ (cruise down the left side of the page to find a very nice selection of patters. ALL FREE.)

    sew them together at the narrow ends to make fans, then applique them to background blocks.

    the sky is the limit.
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