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Thread: Color Chart Help

  1. #1
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    Color Chart Help

    I'm not the best at selecting colors. At least I don't think so. Do you take a color wheel with you when you go fabric shopping? There is one at Nancy's Notions that looks like a paint sample ring. Isn't there some kind of color wheel that is specific to quilting or fabric that isn't different than what a typical artists color wheel is?

    Any information would be appreciated. I think it would help me to think out of my little comfort zone of color a little more.
    Cheryl Robinson
    http://www.silverneedlestitching.com
    APQS Millenium Longarm with Intelliquilter

  2. #2
    Super Member auntpiggylpn's Avatar
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    No one has ever become poor by giving. - Anne Frank
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  3. #3
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    a color wheel is a color wheel. If you want one, find one that you like that is relatively inexpensive.

  4. #4
    Super Member carslo's Avatar
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    I just received some quilting junk mail to subscribe to some expensive books and in the midst of the paperwork was a color wheel. I cut it out and threw the rest of the stuff away and now I have a free color wheel. I put it in a small ziplock bag to keep fresh. Maybe you will get the same junk mail!
    A bed without a quilt is like the night sky without stars.

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  5. #5
    Super Member ghostrider's Avatar
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    A color wheel won't help you very much unless you know how to use it. There are lots of websites, classes and books these days that can teach you about color theory...many specifically for quilters. It's great fun, not complicated at all, and can make color use and selection so much easier.

    BellaOnline has a good series on color theory and they start right out with how to use the color wheel (but don't stop there!).
    http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art4672.asp
    Last edited by ghostrider; 09-20-2012 at 06:53 AM. Reason: spelling
    The Earth without art is just "Eh".

  6. #6
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    For someone who doesn't understand color and wants a short cut here is a very old way that still works great. Find a piece of fabric in a print with a lot of colors that you REALLY like, like a plaid or a floral or whatever. The main thing is it should have a LOT of colors Then take this with you to select colors for a quilt. The colors in the fabric swatch are already color coordinated to each other; just match your colors to the colors in the swatch. If you are buying a piece of fabric to be your swatch be sure and get a piece that includes the dots of color in the selvage. Then you can compage selvage dots to selvage dots when comparing fabric colors. Makes it easier in selecting colors. And double check your colors in the sunlight before you have them cut the bolt. Not all lighting in the stores will show the true colors.

  7. #7
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    you should be able to get a very inexpensive color wheel in the art department at Joanns/Michaels/Hobby Lobby, as stated before....a color wheel is a color wheel, weather it is used in art, the garden or while planning a quilt....another valuable lesson to learn is values and intensity and hues....Do some "googling" for a further explanation of these terms.
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  8. #8
    Super Member PaperPrincess's Avatar
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    I find a large scale print with colors I like, and buy about a yard. If it has the color registration dots so much the better. I use this fabric as a color map to choose colors for my quilt. Sometimes I don't even use the original fabric in the quilt, just use it to select the other fabrics. The fabric designers usually have better color sense than I do.
    "I do not understand how anyone can live without one small place of enchantment to turn to."
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaperPrincess View Post
    I find a large scale print with colors I like, and buy about a yard. If it has the color registration dots so much the better. I use this fabric as a color map to choose colors for my quilt. Sometimes I don't even use the original fabric in the quilt, just use it to select the other fabrics. The fabric designers usually have better color sense than I do.
    Jinny Beyer has a book out that says to START there - and then use colors that 'bridge' from color A to color B to color C.


    Doing that avoids some of the matchy-matchy that can be a bit boring, but still keeps the colors compatible.

    For example: One has a blue fabric and a green fabric - she would use a blue-green fabric as the third one instead of matching either the blue or the green.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bearisgray View Post
    Jinny Beyer has a book out that says to START there - and then use colors that 'bridge' from color A to color B to color C.


    Doing that avoids some of the matchy-matchy that can be a bit boring, but still keeps the colors compatible.

    For example: One has a blue fabric and a green fabric - she would use a blue-green fabric as the third one instead of matching either the blue or the green.
    I just read about Jinnie's color matching and it was on the internet somewhere - I think on her studio site but not sure. When she talked about bridge fabrics, that made a light go off - she showed how to add sparkle with the bridge fabrics . Really great to learn.

    Edit: Went to look realy quick - at jinniebeyer.com under tips and tricks.
    Last edited by sewmary; 09-20-2012 at 10:27 AM.

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