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Thread: Comfort Quilt

  1. #1
    Junior Member momski's Avatar
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    So the bad news keeps rolling in... we just found out my Uncle has stage 4 lung cancer. It is a really rare, genetic form that attacks muscle fibers of the organs. As many of you know, there is a slim chance of surviving lung cancer (under 20%) and his odds are even less because of the type of cancer he has. SO, he is starting experimental treatment in 2 weeks and I want to make him a comfort quilt to take with him during treatment.

    I have put together a LSU themed quilt that incorporates 6 inch solid and signature blocks for his loved ones and caregivers to sign. I have two questions about the logistics of this...

    1. What can I put behind each siggy block to stabilize it for persons to sign it after its been quilted and that will survive several washes?

    2. This quilt needs to be super warm. How can I beef it up?

    Ideas that others have mentioned include 1) low loft batting with a fleece backing, 2) high loft batting followed with a flannel backing or 3) two layers of high loft batting with cotton backing. I have not tried any of these before and am not excited about quilting something super thick (like two layers of batting).

    Your input would be greatly appreciated and thanks in advance for your help.

  2. #2
    Moderator sharon b's Avatar
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    I would use a cotton batting like warm and natural and a flannel back, that will make it really warm also help it lay smother for signatures :wink:

    Also for the signatures use a fabric textile pen, sharpies can spread out when signed

    So sorry for the news {{{{{{{{{{{{{{HUGS}}}}}}

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    I am so sorry to hear this (((HUGS)))

    Flannel on the front, except for the spaces for the signatures, cotton batting and flannel on the back.

    This quilt may need frequent washing and cotton batting may hold up better. You could use to layers of this batting :wink:

    Poly batting doesn't wick, although you want him warm, it may be nice that the quilt breathes too.

    High loft battings would also make it harder to sign the blocks.
    JMHO :D:D:D

  4. #4
    Super Member jemma's Avatar
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    watch the weight do not have it too heavy

  5. #5
    Super Member sewcrafty's Avatar
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    Soo sorry to hear about your uncle. {{{{HUGS}}}}

    1. What can I put behind each siggy block to stabilize it for persons to sign it after its been quilted and that will survive several washes?

    The siggie block itself shouldn't have to be stabilized. The one thing I would recommend are these pens by ZIG (in the scrapbooking section at JoAnn's). They have a ballpoint on them and are really easy to write with no pulling. Pigmas for me, because of their fine point, catch on the threads of the fabric and aren't easy for me to write with at all. Also, remember to heat set the signatures before washing.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Brainstorm - How about stabilizing the signature area after quilting with a small hoop while person is signing area?

    I prefer cotton batting (Warm and Natural) and preshrunk flannel backing because the fibers wick and breathe.

    You are a very thoughtful niece and the quilt will wrap him in the warmth of your love.

  7. #7
    Senior Member MZStitch's Avatar
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    When I make half square triangles I put my block on a piece of sandpaper, then with my ruler draw a line down the center. I do this so my block never shifts, wonder if this would be a good way to stablalize the block while someone puts thier signature on it as long as it's low grit sandpaper and you use something like a sharpie?

  8. #8
    Super Member mpspeedy's Avatar
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    Iron a piece of freezer paper on the back of the area to be signed. After the signature or message is done just peel off the paper. Flannel on the back of the quilt will keep it from sliding off the bed or the patient's lap.

  9. #9
    Super Member
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    iron on freezer paper. peels right off after signing. works like a charm. did this with kids for a teacher gift

  10. #10
    Power Poster CarrieAnne's Avatar
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    Aw, so sorry to hear about your Uncle!

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