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Thread: cut bias strips fast

  1. #1
    Super Member AlwaysQuilting's Avatar
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    I just watched a Fons and Porter episode where Marianne had Diane Aholt on who showed how to cut bias strips quickly from a square of fabric.
    I never saw this technique before although maybe lots of you might already do it this way.
    1. Cut a square of fabric (at least 24", but larger is better and makes longer strips).
    2. Iron the fabric in half, then quarters. Then open up flat so you can see the creases.
    3. Fold each corner to the center where the creases intersect making a smaller square. Do not overlap any of the edges. Just butt them against each other and all points should meet in center.
    4. Cut one folded edge off approx. 1/8".
    5. Now without opening the folded square, continue cutting the correct width strips.
    You will now have several bias strips that are ready to be sewn together, end to end, to make one long bias strip.
    There is a little waste fabric from where the corners met, but that's all.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mzzzquilts's Avatar
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    Thanks, will have to try that.

  3. #3
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    Interesting! I will try it, too.

  4. #4
    Power Poster blueangel's Avatar
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    Thanks

  5. #5
    Senior Member coloradosky's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing this. I have bookmarked.

  6. #6
    Super Member AlwaysQuilting's Avatar
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    OK now its morning and I've just re-read my original post from yesterday.
    After sleeping on this idea--would this technique really make strips that are on the bias the entire length or would only the end portions be bias?

    If you visualize each strip as having 3 sections----(#1 and #2) ends that will have been cut from the folded over corners and (#3)the middle length of each strip that will have been cut from the back of the folded square.
    I mean wouldn't #3 still be on either straight or cross-grain?

    Diane Aholt nor Marianne Fons mentioned anything about this on the show so I could be wayyy wrong. They said "it makes bias strips" so I assumed they meant the entire length of each strip would be on the bias.

    Maybe I'm not awake yet and shouldn't post this till I actually try it but I don't have time today. I'm going into work 2 hrs early.
    I hope someone (who has more logic than I) can answer this.

    BTW the Fons and Porter episode I saw this on was #1802.

  7. #7
    Super Member eparys's Avatar
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    That is a great idea. :thumbup: That would work perfectly if you needed a small amount. I use the "Continuous Bias Taps" method when I want bias for a binding. That too is a cool way but I tend to make too much when I do it:

    http://www.fiber-images.com/Free_Thi...bias_tape.html

  8. #8
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    Good morning, Nadine :)
    I was curious about the technique so I took a piece of advertising paper which had printing on one side only. I cut the paper square, did the folding and marked each strip with a ruler. Three strips had two pieces: 1 and 1a, 2 and 2a, 4 and 4a. I had four strip rows plus one folded piece I could open up and trim to the exact width of the others which I have named 5. Strip 3 was in one long piece with irregular ends.

    All strips are on the true diagonal of 45 degrees!

    So, I ended up with one triangle to toss and 7 usable strips: 2 short strips, 1 extra short strip, 3 medium strips and 1 long strip.

    By stapling the strips together as if they were 1/4 inch seams, I ended up with 7 seams.

    With the time to piece all these different size strips, I doubt that I will use this method. I had to think too much! However this can be done. My sample size started with just 8.5 inch square of paper.

    I am always willing to try new ideas and appreciate you having shared this technique. Hope you have a good day:):)

  9. #9
    Ed
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    Thank you.

  10. #10
    Super Member AlwaysQuilting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kay carlson
    All strips are on the true diagonal of 45 degrees!
    So, I ended up with one triangle to toss and 7 usable strips: 2 short strips, 1 extra short strip, 3 medium strips and 1 long strip.
    I am always willing to try new ideas and appreciate you having shared this technique. Hope you have a good day:):)
    They (on the show) also had some waste but not too much.
    Thank you for posting.

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