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Thread: Do "New" Quilt books instruct traditional, or do they incorporate "shortcut" techniqu

  1. #1
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    Do "New" Quilt books instruct traditional, or do they incorporate "shortcut" techniqu

    I've been playing over on youtube a bit, and I see some great shortcuts and different techniques to build blocks or pieces-parts, etc. One that comes to mind is Missouri Star's toot for easy pinwheels by sewing two charms completely around the 4 sides, and cutting "X" across the piece and WAH-LAH! Instant pinwheel parts!
    Another one is linked here in our banner on "Playing with Boston Blocks" and shows how to create the triangle pieces without actually cutting out triangles.

    My question is: Do quilt books tend to incorporate these shortcut techniques, or do they instruct what *I* would call "traditional" ways of piecing?

    I'm also reminded of a thread where one gal was feeling like her guild members were "offish" to her as a young newcomer, and I wondered if it was because, perhaps, there is a generation gap in the quilting arena where more mature quilters have learned these traditional piecing methods, and newer quilters are perhaps all taught the "shortcuts," which the more mature quilters might "pooh-pooh" as not "real" quilting?

    Is there any logic or truth in what I'm trying to say here?

  2. #2
    Power Poster mighty's Avatar
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    There is alot of truth and logic to what you are saying. I say if it works for you then what is the problem!!! I am not sure about the books. I suppose it depends on who is writting it and there way of doing things.

  3. #3
    Super Member Grama Lehr's Avatar
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    My question, do you use scissors or a rotary cutter? Traditional quilters used scissors.
    I say do what works best for you!!
    Marie

    You don't stop laughing because you grow old. You grow old because you stop laughing.
    A smile is something you can't give away; it always comes back to you.

  4. #4
    Super Member JulieR's Avatar
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    Good question. I think there are "purists" in any activity and quilting is no exception, but most of us (including authors) live somewhere in the middle. I'm not gluing my applique pieces before using needle turn applique, but I'm not whittling my own needles from bones, either. I would imagine each group has its own style and some folks are simply more accepting than others (or maybe just take a longer view).

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    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
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    It really depends on the author. If I like a pattern but do not like the technique used for the piecing, I just use the technique I like and just purchase a little extra fabric to make sure I have enough for my way of doing it.

  6. #6
    Super Member Peckish's Avatar
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    I think it depends on the book and author - and the age of the book. I have no problem with shortcuts; if I can get there easier, why not.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99 View Post
    It really depends on the author. If I like a pattern but do not like the technique used for the piecing, I just use the technique I like and just purchase a little extra fabric to make sure I have enough for my way of doing it.
    I hope to one day know enough about this "way of life" that I recognize that there IS another way of doing (it)

    Quote Originally Posted by JulieR View Post
    Good question. I think there are "purists" in any activity and quilting is no exception, but most of us (including authors) live somewhere in the middle. I'm not gluing my applique pieces before using needle turn applique, but I'm not whittling my own needles from bones, either. I would imagine each group has its own style and some folks are simply more accepting than others (or maybe just take a longer view).
    Funny you should say that...if my dad had his way, we'd still be haying the back field with draft horses (I kid you not).
    Last edited by Teeler; 01-14-2013 at 12:34 PM. Reason: Edit to add....

  8. #8
    Super Member OKLAHOMA PEACH's Avatar
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    I think short cuts are used as they become established by quilt designers and authors, but I have several old, I mean old quilting books that have the same shortcuts that some are putting forth as new or their own ideas.

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    To the first question about tips/techniques to use when making a quilt top - some do, some don't.

    To the second question - I don't think that 'old' techniques vs 'new' techniques has a thing to do with the personality of a particular group of quilters. People are people, and most of us tend to associate with the people who are most like ourselves. That can make 'new comers' feel unwelcome in a particular group, and, in fact, sometimes a new comer is unwelcome. But just as often, it's not intentional, it's just a personality mis-match.

    So we keep going until we find (or begin) the right group for us.

  10. #10
    Super Member ArtsyOne's Avatar
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    If you're buying a book online, take a look at when it was published. I would say that anything published in the last ten years would have the newer shortcut methods that you like. If you have a chance to actually examine a quilting book, they always have a techniques section and you can make your determination from that. I've been quilting for 40 years and absolutely love the new shortcut techniques and the modern quilt movement in general even though I started out with the traditional quilts and methods.
    A fabric stash is always missing that one fabric needed to finish the quilt on which you're working.

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