Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Do You Machine Quilt with Binding on or off?

  1. #1
    Super Member b.zang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    1,779
    Blog Entries
    1
    I learned to do my quilting first, then finish the outside edges of my quilt with binding. Today, as I was struggling to decide on how to quilt this, I went into my books. There were pictures of how to machine quilt and in all the photos the quilt was finished, binding and all. Have I been diong it wrong all this time???

    By the way, I was looking for information on how far apart quilting lines need to be. I have quilted along the dark in a ropey pattern and followed the dark line as it snakes along the quilt, but don't have anything crossing these lines. Do I need them? Ideas? I plan to stitch-in-the-ditch around the pattern and both sides of the sawtooth.

    Hmm, I guess there are two questions here, but I'm going to leave it like this.


    New Year's Day mystery quilt - a big fan
    Name:  Attachment-25255.jpe
Views: 17
Size:  60.9 KB

  2. #2
    Senior Member sewhappy57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Anchorage,Alaska
    Posts
    757
    Your quilting sounds great, I always quilt my quilts with the binding off, then machine sew on binding and flip and hand sew binding to the back. Hope this makes sense. :D

  3. #3
    2wheelwoman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    879
    There are a lot of people here with way more experience, but I'll share my .02. I was taught to quilt BEFORE binding, since the quilting process itself can 'draw up' the fabric a bit, which would then result in the binding not laying flat. So I'd say you're definitely doing it right.

    As for how closely quilt lines should be spaced, usually the batting that I buy has guidelines on the bag or on the roll saying it should be quilted every 4 inches, or 5 inches, or 7 inches or whatever in order for it to be stable.

    Hope this helps

  4. #4
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Alturas, CA
    Posts
    7,748
    I always quilt/tie with the binding off.

  5. #5
    Senior Member QuiltinLee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    536
    I always quilt with binding off. That way if I have any extra on the backing, I can ease it into the binding.

  6. #6
    Super Member Prism99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    9,045
    Blog Entries
    1
    The photos in books are posed. Most likely the people doing the photography don't realize that binding is the last step in the process, after quilting. They just put an already finished quilt under the sewing machine needle as if the quilting had just been done. One would always want to quilt before binding.

    Concerning the spacing of your quilting lines, it all depends on the batting you have used. Do you still have the batting package or insert? They always tell you how far apart the batting needs to be quilted. A traditional 100% cotton batting may need quilting lines no more than 2 inches apart, while a modern needle-punched cotton batting with scrim (such as Warm 'n' Natural) may do fine with quilting lines 6 or 8 inches apart. Whether lines cross or not is not as important as how far apart the quilting lines are from each other. How the quilt will be used can also have an effect on quilting lines.

    A wall hanging that won't be washed frequently can stand to have quilting lines farther apart. A child's quilt that will go through the washing machine and dryer many times in a year will hold up better if quilting lines are closer together.

    Incidentally, that's a lovely quilt!

    Mary

  7. #7
    Senior Member Stitching4Fun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Eastern Shore, Maryland
    Posts
    329
    I always quilt mine before doing the binding, but I have also quilted one that has originally been tie knotted. It turned out good. I had no problems with the back puckering either. It was a first time quilt that was done by a distant family member and someone spilled soda on it and she wanted to wash it. But...............the batting she got was cotton so washing it without close stitching was not an option. I have a hobby longarm so she asked me if I would do it for her before she washed it. As I was doing this, I thought to myself that this is a good way to quilt it. I have one that was done years ago that was tie knotted and I have been thinking about putting it on the frame and machine quilting it also. I don't know if putting a binding on a home machine and trying to quilt it would be a good idea because of the fighting with the bulk of it. On a frame it is pulled tight.

    Barb

  8. #8
    Moderator Machel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Lancaster Pennsylvania
    Posts
    698
    I am the same as sewhappy57. It's just the way I was taught. I think that you have been right all along. Keep up the good work.

  9. #9
    Super Member b.zang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    1,779
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Prism99
    The photos in books are posed. Most likely the people doing the photography don't realize that binding is the last step in the process, after quilting. They just put an already finished quilt under the sewing machine needle as if the quilting had just been done. One would always want to quilt before binding.
    It just didn't occur to me that they would make such an obvious error especially when the pictures are designed to teach! And this is a book I've been taking to heart - The Quilter's Bible :roll:

    Thanks for the tip to check the batting tag. That's in the bottom of my batting bin, so I'll definitely check it out. I've used a cotton batt. When I talk about cross lines, it's because right now my quilting lines are close enough together, but they all run parallel so I need to figure out some way to divide up those long, skinny spaces.

  10. #10
    Super Member Quilt4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Merrimac, MA
    Posts
    8,974
    I Quilt befor binding

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.