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Thread: Do you use open or closed foot for FMQ

  1. #1
    Super Member nannyrick.com's Avatar
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    I would like to know what you all use for FMQ. I purchased a generic open toe foot for my Juki 2010q and have had a lot of problems with it skipping and making large stitches.
    When I put the regular closed foot back on, it is fine.
    I,m wondering if I should purchase the Juki one or just stick with the regular one.
    Oh and I forgot to mention, I did modify it like Leah Day
    shows.

  2. #2
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
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    Open from April1930sshoppe. Works perfectly.

  3. #3
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I use open toe that came with my machine, no modification. I am still trying to figure out the reasoning behind leah days modification

  4. #4
    Super Member Maride's Avatar
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    I used the open toe made for my Bernina. Some generics don't work well in all machines. I am not sure about the modification you talk about. Is it removing the spring so it doesn't hop? If that is I don't think it is causing the problem, but it very well be.

  5. #5
    Super Member leatheflea's Avatar
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    If you made the "Leah" adjustments, you've got your foot adjusted to high. Move the rubber band to allow the foot to sit closer to the fabric. That should help with the skipped stitches. The large stitches is operator error, you just need to slow down. And dont move your quilt until youve made a couple of stitches in one spot. Hope this helps.

  6. #6
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    I use an open toe, it came with the quilter's pack I bought with the sewing machine.

  7. #7
    Super Member ManiacQuilter2's Avatar
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    I wore out my Bernina (for my 1530) walking foot and bought a generic and it doesn't work as well as the Bernina did.

  8. #8
    Super Member nannyrick.com's Avatar
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    I kept moving the rubberband until I finally took it off.
    Yes the foot sat too high. I did twist the metal part on the top though. This ran fine for a few weeks and then all of a
    sudden this problem started and when I changed to the foot that came with the machinea, all was well again, so I have to think that something is awry with the foot.

  9. #9
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    for free motion i use a darning foot- some call it a hopping foot- it is round- and moves up and down as you stitch- made for fmq/darning/thread painting
    it is used without feed dogs- so you can move freely

    a walking foot works with feed dogs - to feed the fabric evenly top and bottom in a straight line.

  10. #10
    Super Member Stitchnripper's Avatar
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    I have three - one plastic made for my machine, small, closed; then a "big foot", closed. And an open toe metal one. I use the open toe metal one most, because I can see better with it. But the other ones work fine too.

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