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Thread: Does anyone here quilt Queens and Kings on their little machines?

  1. #11
    Super Member pumpkinpatchquilter's Avatar
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    I too have a long arm (coming home on Sunday - yippeee!!) but I have quilted large quilts on my domestic. It can be a headache and some designs are just easier on a long arm because of the freedom of movement...but truthfully if you mark and sew carefully you can do just about anything on a domestic that you can a long arm. I also quilt in sections and it helps to quilt in a table or somewhere you can lay the section of the quilt that is NOT being quilted. Turning and pivoting for intricate designs can be a real headache...but before I could convince the Husband that I just NEEDED a long arm I had the motivation to do it on my domestic and I did. (But don't tell him that...)
    Valerie Smith - pumpkinpatchquilter
    Obsessed Quilter and APQS Long Arm Machine Quilter
    www.pumpkinpatchquilter.com

  2. #12
    Member kookey426's Avatar
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    I have always quilted on my DSM..the largest being 122x122..I just quilted FM in quarter sections..had a ball.it's when I have to SID that I don't like..too constricting....just practice,practice,practice..and relax and enjoy the process!!!

  3. #13
    Super Member franc36's Avatar
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    I quilted an oversized king quilt on my small Bernina. I cut the batting in 3rds. The middle section, I quilted first, then added one side of batting and quilted that side. Finally, I added the remaining batting and quilted that section. I used SID for the main part of the quilt and FMQ for the borders. The quilt turned out well; but I do usually try to send king and queen size quilts to the LAQ. Anything smaller, I try to quilt myself. I'm really working on my FMQ.

  4. #14
    Super Member Maggiemay's Avatar
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    I quilted my last oversized queen in sections. I finished the whole top and the whole back then I cut the batting in 3 different sections. I'd quilt a section then whip stitch the next piece of batting in place, baste, then quilt. It took a little longer but I was really happy how it came out. Even with a 9" throat on my machine, I just didn't see how I could wrestle the quilt through there and not lose my mind!

  5. #15
    Super Member Lisa_wanna_b_quilter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stitchnripper View Post
    I did a king size. I did stitch in the ditch and the blocks were set on point, so I started in the middle and worked out. Some of it was a wrestle, but, only the long rows to begin with. This was on a dinky mechanical Brother, Walmart type, which I still use and love (over 10 years old)
    Me, too. Same deal. It's a wrestling match at times, but can be done. And as mentioned, Marti Michell has some great tips in her book. Well worth looking at.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by franc36 View Post
    I quilted an oversized king quilt on my small Bernina. I cut the batting in 3rds. The middle section, I quilted first, then added one side of batting and quilted that side. Finally, I added the remaining batting and quilted that section. I used SID for the main part of the quilt and FMQ for the borders. The quilt turned out well; but I do usually try to send king and queen size quilts to the LAQ. Anything smaller, I try to quilt myself. I'm really working on my FMQ.
    This is the way I do large quilts. Works great for me.
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO what a ride!"
    Susan

  7. #17
    Super Member Sierra's Avatar
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    It is possible to quilt on a domestic machine, but it takes time. When I am doing a queen DH helps me sometimes. That saves me from having to walk around the table to reposition/refold the sandwich and really speeds up things. My largest was 8'x 7.8' and it had a lot of appliques on it which was individually batted (is that a legal way to use that phrase) up to an inch thick in places and was a real challenge. But, with help from DH I did get it sewn. I do have a 6600 Janome and it has the "larger" space between needle and motor. I have an attitude that if I'm making a quilt, then I will make all my quilt. Having said that, I have seen incredibly beautiful quilting done by long arm professionals. Each person has to make up their own approach, keeping within what is really important to them (and it won't necessally make sense to the rest of us).

  8. #18
    Senior Member happyquiltmom's Avatar
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    I've done a queen size on my vintage Bernina 830 Record, all in one piece, too. Didn't have any trouble with it, but it did take several days.
    Cindy

    Curator of an 1889 Singer model 27 Fiddlebase Treadle, a 1951 Singer Centennial Featherweight, a 1956 Singer 401A, and a 1982 Bernina 830 Record.

  9. #19
    Senior Member 4dogs's Avatar
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    I have done about a zillion quilts (I do a lot for LINUS) and I have done 2 KING size ones and lots of full size ones .. and I have never had someone else do the quilting......it has all been done on our "normal" machines....I use either my Bernina 630 or my little IRON LADY the 301 Singer to do them... there are spots that are a little more diffcult to do, but it is very doable.........just pin it really well to start with and then just take your time.. no rushing......it works.....
    Judy, retired RN, alias 4 dogs and in the mountains of western North Carolina.

    Someday you will be a memory - try to make it a good one .

  10. #20
    Super Member Dolphyngyrl's Avatar
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    I think those that do quilt in sections and add the batting as they go so they don't have much bulk under the arm. I am sure there is a book on the subject. I haven't done it, just know it can be done
    Brother XL-3500i, SQ-9050, Dreamweaver XE6200D

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