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Thread: Does Bernina stitch regulator help free hand quilting?

  1. #1
    community benefactor
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    I am having terrible problems using a machine to quilt. Hand Quilting takes too long. Does anyone out there own a Bernina with BSR? Is it easy to use for someone like me, I just can't get this down. Any recommendations on a machine that helps with free hand quilting? I have regular machines right now, they don't quilt real well.

    Thanx,
    TerryS

  2. #2
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Hi Terry, welcome to the board. Do you mind if I ask you for some specifics on the trouble you are having?

    I have used the BSR machines at my LQS, and they are great at maintaining a consistent stitch length, but they are not going to eliminate all of the other possible problems you could be facing. You still have to deal with needle, thread, tension, posture, quilt position, possible drag, and many other issues just as you are facing with your machine right now. Maybe the answer is a bit cheaper than $4,000, if you're interested in trouble-shooting the problems you are having. :D

  3. #3
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    Hi, thank you for responding. I have difficulties maintaining uniform stitch lenghts as well as smoothly moving the bulk around between the pressure foot and plate. I think I need a higher shank. I did purchase a walking foot and that helps. I can do stippling or anything like that with it. I ca hand quilt, but I work 10 hours a day, It takes too long to complete anything.

  4. #4
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    Both of those problems get better with practice I made a small quilt just to work on the get used to the movement and speed. Also before I start quilting a new quilt I grad the practice and work for 10 minutes on that to loosen myself up and get the moving down right. Hope this helps

  5. #5
    Suz
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    Terri,

    I can no longer hand quilt large projects and most of what I am making is queen sized. My solution is to hand my top, batting and back to a friend who has a long-arm quilting machine. She does a wonderful job and it is worth $100 for me to hand the job over to her. I just got a quilt back and now all I have to do is square it up and bind. Sure, I would like a BSR or a long arm, but this is my cheapest solution to the problem and it frees me up to go to my next project.

    Suzanne

  6. #6
    Super Member Yvonne's Avatar
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    Terri,
    I have the Bernina with the BSR. I really like the stitch regulator and I'm getting much better with it but there is still a definite learning curve. It all takes practice. (I can still make uneven stitches even if I don't really try!) :lol:

  7. #7
    Carla P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TerryS
    Hi, thank you for responding. I have difficulties maintaining uniform stitch lenghts as well as smoothly moving the bulk around between the pressure foot and plate. I think I need a higher shank. I did purchase a walking foot and that helps. I can do stippling or anything like that with it. I ca hand quilt, but I work 10 hours a day, It takes too long to complete anything.
    I can COMPLETELY relate to long hours of working, so the last thing you want to do is come home & fight with your sewing machine trying to learn to make beautiful quilting stitches. First, as was mentioned by Ceannastahr, a smaller quilt sandwich is always the best place to start practicing; like 2 FQs with batting. This will benefit you in many ways, the first being that it is smaller and much easier to handle, therefor making it easier for you to learn. You will also be able to more easily determine if some of the problem is with your machine, instead of you. I highly recommend a new needle after 8 hours of sewing; a dull needle will cause ugly stitches. Buy the best quality thread you can afford. While learning, poly embroidery thread (the pretty, shiny kind) is a great tool to use in both the top and bobbin. Being as most of these threads are 60 wt., you will not need an overly large needle, so you can get by with a 10 or 12 (sharp or quilting- not universal and never ball point, unless you are sewing knits). The walking foot is invaluable for quilting straight lines, but useless for free-motion. Get a darning/quilting foot with a spring on it (the little plastic one with the clear foot will do just fine. If you can't find one locally, Ebay has them for about $10. No need to have a high shank machine just to learn to stipple or any other FMQ. Next, check your sewing surface to make sure it is clean & slick. (not greasy just extremely smooth) You can use just about any greaseless silicone spray, teflon sheet, or anything that will help eliminate any drag on your quilt. As was previously stated, it takes some practice... then some more.... & yep, a little more. Everyone learns at a different pace, so do not let yourself get too stressed if you don't find your rythem the first, second, or even tenth time. J/K Seriously, relax and just practice; no stress there. If you mess up, just keep going until you find your rythem. After you have completed a practice square, look at it to evaluate your progress, tension, and stitch length. Go slow if you need to... there's not a prize for being fastest.

    I have gone on a bit too long, I guess. Sorry... again. :oops: :lol:
    There are many other sub-topics to this one, so if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. Also, use the Search feature at the top of the page. You will find many discussions on this topic (I have gone on & on many times before :lol: ). Don't fret, just keep practicing... You WILL get it! :D :D

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