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Thread: Don't throw away your selvage edges

  1. #1
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    I'm sure most of us know this but just a helpful hint for all our newbies and those of us who forget alot.


    The selvedges on fabrics contain some useful information. It tells you the fabric manufacturer and collection title plus the designer. Often the style number of the fabric and a website address will also be printed on the edge of the fabric. This is enormously helpful for you and others helping you when looking for that certain piece of fabric. And don't you think your search results will be much more encouraging when searching for "He Loves Me by Jackie Robinson & Maywood Studio"?

    Not only do fabric selvedges contain manufacturer information, but also they contain little circles which are colors used in the fabric. These little color swatches can greatly help you looking for coordinating fabrics. You don't always need to take the whole piece of yardage when shopping for matching pieces, you can just take that little piece of your fabric selvedge.

  2. #2
    ButtercreamCakeArtist's Avatar
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    :D good idea

  3. #3
    Super Member Pam Pollock's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing. I didn't know that & will keep better track of my selvages from now on. Oh...by the way...how do you keep track of yours? Do you file them somehow or throw them in a bag?

  4. #4
    Super Member ceannastahr's Avatar
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    If you keep a quilt journal attach to the page with the pic and info of the quilt. Or store in a plastic shoe box

  5. #5
    Super Member nanabirdmo's Avatar
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    good idea ceannastahr.
    i have another use also.
    in "real life" 8) i am a bookbinder. i have seen many old books that people have held together wrapped with rubber bands. some are pretty severely damaged by this. using selvage edges does a great job. they are strong, gentle on old books, and safe to use on archival materials.

  6. #6
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Thanks ceanna, that is a great tip :D I did not even think about saving them until recently and that was for a string quilt. Now I will leave a strip attatched to the fabric before I toss the rest in the string bin :D

  7. #7
    Norah's Avatar
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    You only need a small piece, with the information on it to keep for your redords. The rest I use to crochet a rug with. I made one redently, with the knots hanging out that the pup loves to sleep on by the fire (Yes, we have one already), and he loves to use the knots for teething, so I have to watch him.

  8. #8
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    thanks that is a great idea. i have gone back and looked at some of my fabric before for some info. but have never saved it. i believe i will start now now.

    jeanette

  9. #9
    Super Member JoanneS's Avatar
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    I save the selvages cut off of light-color fabrics, and I use them to write the size of strip (especially the length of border pieces) for borders and sashings as I cut them for a project, and tie or pin the selvage piece around the strips for easy recognition when piecing the quilt. Jill

    I save the selvedge strips that I trim off, especially the long ones that I get when cutting borders or backing. Just stuff them into a baggie, and pull out what you need later! Pretty colored ones make great gift ribbons, especially for quilty gifts (sometimes I even cut them a little wider, if I know I want to use them that way). Instead of special bobbin holders, I put a strip of selvedge through the spool hole and bobbin hole, then tie a quick bow. They stay together, and I dont have to try to figure out which bobbin matches the thread I want to use. The more boring strips work as a twine substitute for tying up plants, boxes, etc., even trash bags. Bev

    I keep a tin above my cutting table for selvage edges. Throughout the year, I go to that tin and use the colorful selvage edges for everything. It is much stronger than string, more colorful for tomato plants, and not bothered by the weather. It makes tying up packages fun, and it is using something that would have gone in the trash. Mary

    I found this at 'The Thrifty Quilter'

  10. #10
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoanneS
    I save the selvages cut off of light-color fabrics, and I use them to write the size of strip (especially the length of border pieces) for borders and sashings as I cut them for a project, and tie or pin the selvage piece around the strips for easy recognition when piecing the quilt. Jill

    I save the selvedge strips that I trim off, especially the long ones that I get when cutting borders or backing. Just stuff them into a baggie, and pull out what you need later! Pretty colored ones make great gift ribbons, especially for quilty gifts (sometimes I even cut them a little wider, if I know I want to use them that way). Instead of special bobbin holders, I put a strip of selvedge through the spool hole and bobbin hole, then tie a quick bow. They stay together, and I dont have to try to figure out which bobbin matches the thread I want to use. The more boring strips work as a twine substitute for tying up plants, boxes, etc., even trash bags. Bev

    I keep a tin above my cutting table for selvage edges. Throughout the year, I go to that tin and use the colorful selvage edges for everything. It is much stronger than string, more colorful for tomato plants, and not bothered by the weather. It makes tying up packages fun, and it is using something that would have gone in the trash. Mary

    I found this at 'The Thrifty Quilter'
    Thanks for posting these!!! Very useful information :D :D :D

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