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Thread: Elmer's washable clear school glue

  1. #31
    Super Member Deborahlees's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1screech View Post
    I used it and it was so stiff, I did not think I would ever get the binding stitched down. I do hand stitch my bindings down. It did wash out fine.
    Just a thought, perhaps you used too much....need more like tiny dots
    Yes that is a real picture of my hometown Temecula, California. We feature premiere Wineries, World Class Golf Courses, Pechanga Indian Casino and Hot Air Balloons

  2. #32
    Senior Member lass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndiR View Post
    Several years ago I tried Sharon Schamber's recommendation to use the Elmer's Washable School Glue (the one I use is white) and heat set it as you described. She uses it for bindings as well as her Piecelique technique. I know she has a website and some videos that show this, just google her name. I demonstrated this way of doing bindings by machine at guild last month and everyone loved it!
    I also used Sharon Schamber's glue binding method. I felt like it worked really well \, especially when joining the ends at the very end of the quilt. I have never had them go together so easily.
    Education makes a people easy to lead;difficult to govern; and impossible to enslave

  3. #33
    Junior Member Marjoeal's Avatar
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    I machine stitch my bindings to the front of the quilt, fold it over and hand stitch it to the back. I used to use those long, sharp, yellow headed pins to do this. But I soon got tired of the damage I was causing myself with those pins! I first bought some super tackey fabric glue for attaching the binding on the back. It works, but I had to learn. It is very thick, thin it with Elmer's school glue and/or water. Keep the thin line of glue well inside the fold of your binding. The glue can get hard enough to cause real trouble trying to stitch through it. Use a large pin to open the bottle, not scissors. Practice makes your lines thinner. I always wash it out and I'll NEVER use the pins again. Shucks, I thought I'd thought this up 8^)

  4. #34
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    I just picked up some glue at Target, thanks to this thread. I hope it helps me with my various binding issues. I also picked up an Elmer's glue stick called "Extreme" extra strength - it specifically lists fabric as what it's good for and is still washable. I think it was about a buck and it's one of the bigger size sticks. I'm curious to see how well it works!

  5. #35
    Senior Member AndiR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2pedersens View Post
    I have used the Elmer's glue for lots of things in sewing and I love it. Does anyone know where to get the tips that Sharon Schamber suggests using? I have looked everywhere and can not locate them.
    I don't remember where I got mine (maybe Hobby Lobby or Michaels?), I think they are a tole painting accessory. Yes, they work well, but you have to wash the tips out every time or the glue gets dried up in there. I finally decided they were too much trouble. Now I just crack open the top of the Elmers bottle a teeny tiny bit - just enough to get a really fine line of glue - and use it that way.

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