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Thread: figuring shipping

  1. #1
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    I have some things I would like to sell on here, but am wondering how you ladies (and gentlmen) figure shipping costs. Any help regarding this would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    you need a scale, to weigh the item in its package, then look it up on the USPS website to see your options for shipping.
    I have 2 scales that I got at yard sales, a diet scale that goes up to 2 pounds, and an old baby scale that goes up to 30.

  3. #3
    Super Member Lilrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts
    you need a scale, to weigh the item in its package, then look it up on the USPS website to see your options for shipping.
    I have 2 scales that I got at yard sales, a diet scale that goes up to 2 pounds, and an old baby scale that goes up to 30.
    Are they fairly accurate?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Prissnboot's Avatar
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    I obtain freight quotes all the time for my job and I always add a couple of pounds just to make sure. It doesn't make that much difference in the rate, but it makes sure you aren't losing freight money!

  5. #5
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
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    flat rate boxes are a good way to go if your items will fit in them, that way you know exactly what it's going to be. i use flat rate boxes as much as possible. the usps and ups sites are very helpful

  6. #6
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    What I do is, weigh some packages and write in the corner of them what I got in ounces or pounds, then take them to my PO and see what they get. Or on a small scale, just bring the scale in and make sure it matches the PO readings.
    Works best in a small Post Office,

  7. #7
    np3
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    Power Poster np3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptquilts
    What I do is, weigh some packages and write in the corner of them what I got in ounces or pounds, then take them to my PO and see what they get. Or on a small scale, just bring the scale in and make sure it matches the PO readings.
    Works best in a small Post Office,
    I agree!

  8. #8
    Senior Member Baysidegal's Avatar
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    Yes, I think working with the PO helps. I just received an order from an online fabric shop which had postage due of $5.05 on top of the $4.95 S & H I paid at checkout. The shop stuffed a $4.95 Priorty envelope with fabric and overstuffed it. The Post Office didn't like it. They goofed and I had to pay..

  9. #9
    Super Member ptquilts's Avatar
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    just curious, how many yards did they stuff in there to qualify as overstuffed?

  10. #10
    Super Member leiladylei54's Avatar
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    Generally as a whole, I find the flat rate boxes the best to use when sending things out. As much as you can stuff in the box no matter how much it weighs, it's that one price for that size box. I love that!!!

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