Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: fleece help please

  1. #1
    Super Member KimmieH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,054
    ok....i have decided to give fleece a try.

    I have my quilt top done. and have selected the fleece for backing.
    Based on what i read in other post..i see a batting is not necessary or recommended so i wont be doing that.

    now....i would like to just fold the edges of the fleece over the top of quilt to use as binding. any hints/directions on that?

    also--does the fleece have a right/wrong side?
    i got the one thats currently on sale at joanns..(the one thats not suppose to pile up -but clerk said dont bet on it LOL)

    Do i need to quilt in before doing the binding edges? How would you recommend it...the pattern in a churn dash...and its a crib size quilt.

    Thanks in advance :)
    KimmieH

  2. #2
    Super Member oatw13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,750
    Is there a wrong and right side to fleece?

    Yes, there is. Gently stretch the edge of the fabric that has been cut across from selvage to selvage. The fabric will curl to the wrong side.

    Found here: http://www.homefamily.net/index.php?...g_with_fleece/

  3. #3
    Power Poster amma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Out searching for some sunshine :-)
    Posts
    59,113
    Blog Entries
    1
    Yes, quilt before doing the binding :D:D:D

  4. #4
    Super Member sewwhat85's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    missouri
    Posts
    6,726
    good info i didnt know that

  5. #5
    Super Member babyfireo4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Peru, Indiana
    Posts
    1,567
    Blog Entries
    2
    never even thought of using fleece as a backing! What a neat idea.

  6. #6
    Super Member ckcowl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    9,140
    i use fleece and minkie alot for backs...a couple things...use a stretch stitch, if possible lessen the pressure the foot puts on the fabric (to help with drag) some machines allow this, others do not...if it's possible it helps. since you are not using a batting you do not have to worry about density of quilting...just enough to hold it together is enough, i recommend a large swooping all over design. or you could just do a few lines down and across...you don't need alot of quilting. after it is quilted then you trim your backing to about an inch larger around the quilt (if you are going to turn under the edge)then turn it to the front, pin well and stitch it down. when laying your sandwich out be careful to not stretch the fleece just smooth out the wrinkles...and baste well.

  7. #7
    Diecy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bentonia, MS
    Posts
    114
    I've seen fleece quilted and it quilts up nicely. I didn't think it would look as good as it did.

  8. #8
    Super Member 0tis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    2,498
    Great advice - I have considered using fleece also - great topic.

  9. #9
    Super Member KimmieH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Western NY
    Posts
    1,054
    thanks! will give a shot

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    539
    This is great information. I've never used fleece or Minkie on the backs of my quilts, though I've often thought of doing it. So my question is, while it seems most pull the fleece around to make the binding, how does using regular cotton binding work out when fleece is on the back? Thanks! :D

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.