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Thread: FMQ on Singer 301

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannymom
    WM=WalMart
    yes, lower the feed dogs, use a darning foot (available for slant machines at Hancocks - and other places)
    no, not with dots, I've not found that little bitty dots help much, if you look in the gardening department at WM you will see what I'm talking about IF they are still available this time of year because they've already started putting out Christmas stuff
    I didn't move the stitch regulator - it doesn't matter with a darning foot and feed dogs down
    I didn't use a design - I used "free motion", which is what you asked about
    I just recently bought a Singer 301 but haven't got it set up yet. What do you mean about the stitch regulator? Is that just the stitch length dial?
    Glad to know that so many have had success with FMQ and this machine. Can't wait to get started.

  2. #12
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    That Website in my signature has some machines with discounted prices, but it's different everyday, so I don't know if you will find there what your looking for.

  3. #13
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    Yes, it is the stitch length dial.

  4. #14
    Super Member desertrose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by quiltingcurious
    What is WM? It's very encouraging to hear how you've done several full sized quilts on your 301.
    If you do another, it would be great to see your technique.
    Are you talking about the cloth kind with rubber dots on the palms?
    Did you lower your feed dog. I first did that but it seemed to be better with the feed dog up.
    What did you put your stitch regulator on? I put it on the lowest position available.
    I know it will be a lot of practice to go in all directions.
    How did you transfer your design to the quilt top?
    Thanks for all your help.

    At first you may want to use quilting templates to mark the design on the quilt blocks or onto blocks that are a solid color by using any number of available marking pencils. Some use mechanical pencils, washable marking pens, chalk pens on dark colors, some pens fade off over night so only mark areas you can quilt immediately and there are pounce chalk bags that are used to mark the cut out lines on the stencils. You may also trace designs onto tracing, tissue or vellium paper and make your own stencils by transferring your designs to stencil plastic. There are also tutorials regarding sewing through the traced or drawn designs on the tracing type papers and then tear away after your sewn the design onto you quilt. Quilting Made Easy also makes marked stencil stripes for the borders as well as some block designs. You can find them online and order directly from them. I know this was a lot of information and probably confusing, I apologize. If you have any questions you can PM me and I'd be happy to help you. There are lots of new things to learn and of course you'll have questions. That's why we're here and only too happy to help where we can. Happy Quilting Always.

    Andie, desertrose

  5. #15
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    if you bunch your quilt you will find you can put more in your throat than rolling it. I think its harder to do stitch in the ditch than meandering...I also like the look better of meandering than stitch in the ditch which I have done several times and regretted that choice. it was ok but not nice as all over quilting

  6. #16
    Super Member carolaug's Avatar
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    I totally agree about Machingers and you can get them at Joanns on line and use their 50 percent coupons. they are not expensive.
    Quote Originally Posted by lewisl
    Machingers gloves for FMQ. Sorry to be bossy about it, but just try them and you'll be sold. Lightweight and breathable (I've accidentally gotten up from my machine and wandered around doing other things while still wearing them and not noticed!). When they start to get worn out you can just switch them to the other hand which gives you a new surface.

    The woman who does instructional videos on Superior Threads' website wears Machingers, I've noticed.

    Please just try them! (Unless you have large hands, try the S/M ones first).

  7. #17
    k3n
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    I have to disagree with the advice to start by marking - I would say to work freehand, starting with a meander then once you have that smooth and even, start doodling in some patterns, simple to start with (flower shapes for eg). I would also try doodling on paper first - this doesn't work for everyone but it's worth a try because if it works for you it helps a lot - the drawing motion kind of 'locks' the design in your brain then you can translate it to FMQ.

    I think it's MORE dificult to follow a drawn line than work freehand and also that it will limit you in the long run when you want to move on to working freehand, and if you get into FMQ you WILL. Do bear in mind that unless you are blessed with innate natural ability, you will need lots of PRACTICE so don't get disheartened if you can't get it right straight away. I have heard the ability to FMQ compared to learning to write - how long did that take you? :-D Good luck and presevere - for me, it has been the single most rewarding aspect of patchwork and quilting that I've learnt. :D

  8. #18
    Super Member pjnesler's Avatar
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    Watching YouTube examples of FMQ is really helpful too - watch a bunch whenever you can, when you find one with a pattern you want to try, watch it again right before you start your project, very helpful to me...:)

  9. #19
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    I've read about the washable marking pens and I'm a little afraid of trying them.
    I'm depending on others' personal experience and preference to what really works and comes out of the quilt.
    What have you found works for you on light and dark fabrics?
    Thanks for the offer to pm you, I'll do that. I'm sure more confusing things will arise as I go on.
    I'm reading different books and have watched tutorials online and utube, but sometimes it still doesn't make something clear to me.

  10. #20
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    I did start with meandering and spent about an hour, it was very enjoyable, but I wondered if I had a design I'd like to put on my alternate blocks like a rosebud formation if I shouldn't try to do a stenciled design.
    I drew freehand a design and found I was having some trouble seeing my lines but made leaf shapes anyway, the vein markings were more difficult. I thought I wouldn't have the ability to turn the quilt like I was the quilt sandwich and I wondered how I'd be able to complete the design going in a limited direction with the blocks sewn together as the quilt top?

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