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Thread: Fusible batting questions

  1. #1
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    Fusible batting questions

    I want to try fusible batting on my next quilt, but have questions. How do you iron it? - do you spread it out on the floor? - just a small section at a time on the ironing board? I just can't figure out a good way to do this. Do you have to sandwich and then pin everything first? How well do the layers stick together? -(I am still having issues with fusible batting). Does the sticky wash out? Can I do a king sized quilt? or is it just for small things. I need your experience to show me the way! Thanks in advance - everyone is great about answering my silly questions....LOL!

  2. #2
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    You asked a lot of good questions, and I don't know the answers. I've only used the fusible batting for small projects such as totes and purses. I'll be watching this thread for the answers also.

  3. #3
    Power Poster QuiltE's Avatar
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    ITA I think that the fusible batting is usually used for the smaller projects too.
    For the quilt sandwiches, spray basting is usually the way to stick it all together. Plus, it's not permanent, so you can peel it back if you don't get your quilt on right, the first time.
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  4. #4
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    I've seen it sold in as big as a queen sized section, so am thinking it must be intended for large quilts. I meant "still having issues with fusible fleece" in OP....sorry.

  5. #5
    Super Member dellareya's Avatar
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    I only use it on smaller projects like purses, place mats and table-runners. I love how it works for these projects. Super important to read the directions and to follow them.

  6. #6
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    I love fusible batting and have used it on all my latest quilts - ever since I discovered it. The largest I have made is a twin size.

    I use Hobbes 80/20. it is low loft and washes beautifully, with no stiffness left. I cut it to size, spread it carefully on the backing, spread out the top carefully and iron it from the center, if it's a big quilt, or from top to bottom, if it's small enough to do on the ironing board. Once the top is ironed, I let it all cool, then turn the sandwich over and do the same thing from the back, so that the backing is well attached as well. If there are creases, you can re-position the backing easily since the 'gluing' is not too strong.

    During the quilting process, I will sometimes re-iron the layers, especially if I've been stuffing the sandwich through the machine throat a bit too energetically or too often.

    I find that the best results are when you use pure cotton fabric both on the top and the backing. It works on polyester, but not with quite as much stability.

    Fusible batting is wonderful for quilt as you go strip quilts: the batting does NOT stick to the iron, and you can really get the strips straight and well pressed.

    If it didn't exist, or if I could no longer get it, I think I would have a real problem, since I don't baste well at all!

    Might I add that fusible batting is NOT the same as fusible fleece? I think there might be a bit of confusion on this.
    Last edited by Maggiem; 05-20-2012 at 08:14 AM.
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  7. #7
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    I have used Hobbs 80/20 fusible on a twin size and many smaller sizes. I love the stuff! I iron it on the old carpet in the basement. I found that trying to iron on the ironing lard was too difficult and I couldn't get it as smooth as I wanted. First I put on my knee pads from the $store. I lay out the backing on the old carpet with wrong side up. I smooth the batting with my hands on top of the backing. I then smooth out the top on top of the batt. I start in the middle of the quilt top and iron across it right and left. I press down to iron with a nice pressure before moving to the next spot. I then gradually iron across the next section right and left until I have ironed out to one end. I then start back in the middle of the top and iron the second half in the same manner.
    I flip over the whole sandwich because the sandwich should be one piece now. I start the same press/iron method in the center of the back and iron outwards towards the edges. I find that by the time I get the backing ironed to the edge, I have to peal the edge back and re-iron because the fabric has advanced a little more backing towards the edge. Since the backing is what I can't see while FMQ I make sure it is perfect. I place a few safety pins along the edges in case I catch the sandwich while quilting and I don't want the edge to peel. I start FMQ in the center and work out. When I get the center third in the middle quilted, if needed I re-iron the back. I have only used the Hobbs so I can't say if the other brands are the same. Hope this gives you some ideas on how to proceed. Good luck.


  8. #8
    Super Member Buckeye Rose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tartan View Post
    I have used Hobbs 80/20 fusible on a twin size and many smaller sizes. I love the stuff! I iron it on the old carpet in the basement. I found that trying to iron on the ironing lard was too difficult and I couldn't get it as smooth as I wanted. First I put on my knee pads from the $store. I lay out the backing on the old carpet with wrong side up. I smooth the batting with my hands on top of the backing. I then smooth out the top on top of the batt. I start in the middle of the quilt top and iron across it right and left. I press down to iron with a nice pressure before moving to the next spot. I then gradually iron across the next section right and left until I have ironed out to one end. I then start back in the middle of the top and iron the second half in the same manner.
    I flip over the whole sandwich because the sandwich should be one piece now. I start the same press/iron method in the center of the back and iron outwards towards the edges. I find that by the time I get the backing ironed to the edge, I have to peal the edge back and re-iron because the fabric has advanced a little more backing towards the edge. Since the backing is what I can't see while FMQ I make sure it is perfect. I place a few safety pins along the edges in case I catch the sandwich while quilting and I don't want the edge to peel. I start FMQ in the center and work out. When I get the center third in the middle quilted, if needed I re-iron the back. I have only used the Hobbs so I can't say if the other brands are the same. Hope this gives you some ideas on how to proceed. Good luck.


    do you prewash your fabrics? will starching the backing affect how well it sticks? I like to starch the backing pretty stiff so it helps prevent wrinkles.

  9. #9
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    I test for bleeders before using my fabrics and only wash if needed. I starch my fabrics and my back but not too heavily. I do starch the top side of my backing rather than the wrong side that would be against the batting. I have not had a problem with it sticking to my front and back. I have only once had a problem with one quilt not sticking well. I don't know if it was the fabric or a faulty batt but it stuck well enough to FMQ. I did have to iron it twice though.

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