Welcome to the Quilting Board!

Already a member? Login above
loginabove
OR
To post questions, help other quilters and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our quilting community. It's free!

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Fusible Grid

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Dunnellon, FL
    Posts
    2
    I have been reading and watching quilting shows for some time. While I have been sewing since I was 8, I realize quilting is a whole new skill. I am interested in using fusible grid interfacing as my first large quilt. Has anyone used it and have any pros and cons they can share. Also what are some of the techniques used to piece it together to make larger quilts. It appears to come in widths o 42", 44" and 45". Any ideas or thoughts are greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Super Member irishrose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Cadillac, MI
    Posts
    6,451
    Blog Entries
    19
    I saw a video. IMO, it looks like another gadget to make quilting more expensive. I keep thinking my grandmother only needed a needle, fabric, scissors and tempates and I will never be the quilter she was.

    I can see where it might help with a lot of small pieces, but not the size the video was using.

  3. #3
    Super Member quiltlonger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Rushford, NY
    Posts
    1,690
    I've used it for small watercolor quilts/wallhangings with 2" squares not sure why on Big quilt..

  4. #4
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,316
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by irishrose
    I saw a video. IMO, it looks like another gadget to make quilting more expensive. I keep thinking my grandmother only needed a needle, fabric, scissors and tempates and I will never be the quilter she was.

    I can see where it might help with a lot of small pieces, but not the size the video was using.
    I got a piece of it several years ago at a trunk show I went to. It was intended to be used for a landscape quilt, or one of those with all the flowers. I have a lot of fabric for it, but it got put in a drawer and has not been a priority; one of these days I will play with it. It seems that nowadays there are so many other newer techniques that would be just as easy. Once you sew all the rows in one direction you have to snip the seams where the intersections will be and then sew the rows in the other direction. I am also wondering if it will add stiffness to it. The seams will certainly be bulkier.

  5. #5
    Super Member Lori S's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    8,475
    I use quite a bit on various project. I do not think I would use it on a full size quilt , or a bed quilt. The interfacing does restrict the fabric from being able to "puff", and move. Its great for wall hangings as the extra support keeps everything nice and square.
    If I did do a full bed size , I would do it in blocks , and attach the blocks together, it would be a lot easier to handle, and the fusible sometimes lets go of the fabric squares prior to sewing. This would be a particular problem on a full size quilt. The intersections are bulky , now you will have four layers of fabric and four of interfacing. This will be problematic when it comes time to quilt it. I find starch ( some times lots of it) will accomplish more of what I need, and less bulk.
    Its fun to play with ... But I use it on small stuff.
    I have been known to use it on large 1/2 triangle ot keep those bias's behaving. But shhhh... don't tell ! :)

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Dunnellon, FL
    Posts
    2
    Thank you so much for your reply. I tried making one large quilt with 9 square blocks. It was a disaster. No matter what I did it just did not come out right. Such a waste of fabric time. I thought the fusible grid might give me another chance to try again and have some success, but I guess not. Some of the posts made me feel more like a failure till I saw your's. Its a shame I really wanted to learn to quilt.

  7. #7
    Super Member LeslieFrost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Trego, WI
    Posts
    1,870
    Blog Entries
    41
    You can learn to make quilts! Set your sights low and just try it! Many people on this Board are very, very good, but lots of us are average at best. We just like to sew and make things. If that describes you, just try it!

  8. #8
    Power Poster BellaBoo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Front row
    Posts
    14,671
    Blog Entries
    2
    I bought it by the yard at Hancock's Fabric, it's very lightweight with the grid printed on it. Not stiff at all. It's perfect for watercolor design quilts. It's so cheap to buy I used it to back my tissue patterns that tear so easy. I think I paid about $1 a yard at one of the fabric sales. If you have trouble sewing big squares together cut freezer paper to the size square you want, iron fabric to the paper and then sew the paper backed fabric together. The fabric will stay in place and you will have perfect squares. It will take more time to remove the paper but give you a head start to get the accuracy you want.

  9. #9
    Senior Member DawnMarie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    844
    Blog Entries
    9
    I agree that it is nice for watercolor quilts.

  10. #10
    Super Member grann of 6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glenmoore, PA
    Posts
    7,316
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by websurfer54
    Thank you so much for your reply. I tried making one large quilt with 9 square blocks. It was a disaster. No matter what I did it just did not come out right. Such a waste of fabric time. I thought the fusible grid might give me another chance to try again and have some success, but I guess not. Some of the posts made me feel more like a failure till I saw your's. Its a shame I really wanted to learn to quilt.
    It is NEVER a waste of time. You didn't learn to drive a car in just one try. The key is starting with a simple pattern and a small project. I started with table runners. Something like rail fence or log cabin is a good way to start. Once you have mastered the straight 1/4" seam, then try something where you are matching seams, etc. before going to HSTs or anything with a bias. I have been sewing for 65 years but still consider myself rather a novice at quilting. You just need patience and above all, don't get discouraged. The nice thing about quilting is that it DOES NOT have to be perfect, no one but you will see the "woopsies". And you keep those a secret. Remember, there are no quilt police.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.